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And PLEASE don't fall into the trap of thinking you can lock an arbitrary instance of Class A and that will somehow serve to lock another instance of Class A. That's a classical beginner's mistake.

I had made the mistake a few times before I understood it. But the static lock object works properly.

MyThread

package com.replanet;

public class MyThread extends Thread {

    private int x, y;
    private static Object lock3 = new Object();

    public MyThread(int x, int y) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        super.run();
        try {
            test_Method();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

    private void test_Method() throws InterruptedException {
        synchronized (lock3) {
            System.out.println("test_Method " + Thread.currentThread().getName());
            for (int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++) {
                if (i == Integer.MAX_VALUE / 2) {
                    Thread.sleep(2000);
                    System.out
                            .println("Leaving test_Method on " + Thread.currentThread().getName());
                    return;
                }
            }
        }
    }

}

Usage

package com.replanet;

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        MyThread myThread1 = new MyThread(1, 2);
        MyThread myThread2 = new MyThread(1, 2);
        myThread1.start();
        myThread2.start();
    }
}

Output

test_Method Thread-0
Leaving test_Method on Thread-0
test_Method Thread-1
Leaving test_Method on Thread-1

Output with non-static lock object (does not suit me)

test_Method Thread-0
test_Method Thread-1
Leaving test_Method on Thread-1
Leaving test_Method on Thread-0

Is it a good idea to use static lock object?

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2  
It doesn't make much sense to me to have a static Object and two Threads modifying it, why not just do the work in a single Thread? –  Bob Flannigon Feb 19 '13 at 9:39
    
@BobFlannigon, the code I have posted is a very simplified piece of code from my real application. I have got a lot of threads working simultaneously and have to take care of a part of code and allow the only one thread to enter it. –  Maksim Dmitriev Feb 19 '13 at 9:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can lock on the Class itself - this makes more sense and is easier to read:

private void test_Method() throws InterruptedException {
        synchronized (MyThread.class) {
            System.out.println("test_Method " + Thread.currentThread().getName());
            for (int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++) {
                if (i == Integer.MAX_VALUE / 2) {
                    Thread.sleep(2000);
                    System.out
                            .println("Leaving test_Method in " + Thread.currentThread().getName());
                    return;
                }
            }
        }
    }

Or, if you do not need the method to be an instance method:

private static synchronized void test_Method() throws InterruptedException {
            System.out.println("test_Method " + Thread.currentThread().getName());
            for (int i = 0; i < Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++) {
                if (i == Integer.MAX_VALUE / 2) {
                    Thread.sleep(2000);
                    System.out
                            .println("Leaving test_Method in " +  Thread.currentThread().getName());
                    return;
                }
            }
    }

You may also want to read up on the new(ish) Lock class.

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MyThread.class suits me. Thank you! –  Maksim Dmitriev Feb 19 '13 at 9:45

Instead of static it would be nicer to have MyThread share one lock object. More object oriented.

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Whether it's static or instance member depends on the scope you want it to have, but what definitely is a good practice is having a private object to lock on. This is the main advantage over locking on the (obviously public) class object.

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