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Is it possible to use a hash in a LIFO or FIFO way? How can I make sure that the hash is printed in the same order the elements where added?

#!/usr/bin/perl

print "content-type: text/html \n\n";

# BEGINNING HASH
%coins = ( "Quarter" , .25,
          "Dime" ,    .10,
          "Nickel",   .05 );
# PRINT THE OLD HASH
while (($key, $value) = each(%coins)){
    print $key.", ".$value."<br />";
}

# ADD NEW ELEMENT PAIRS
$coins{Penny} = .01;
$coins{HalfDollar} = .50;

# PRINT THE NEW HASH
print "<br />";
while (($key, $value) = each(%coins)){
     print $key.", ".$value."<br />";
}

This gives

Nickel, 0.05
Dime, 0.1
Quarter, 0.25

Nickel, 0.05
Dime, 0.1
HalfDollar, 0.5
Penny, 0.01
Quarter, 0.25
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can either keep a separate array of the hash keys, so that you can write

my @coins = qw/ Quarter Dime Nickel Penny HalfDollar /;

for my $key (@coins) {
  print "$key, $coins{$key}<br />\n";
}

or you can install and use the Tie::IxHash module, which will keep the hash elements in the order they were inserted, like this

use strict;
use warnings;

use Tie::IxHash;
tie my %coins, 'Tie::IxHash';

print "content-type: text/html \n\n";

%coins = (
  Quarter => 0.25,
  Dime    => 0.10,
  Nickel  => 0.05,
);

while (my ($key, $value) = each %coins){
    print "$key, $value<br />\n";
}

$coins{Penny} = .01;
$coins{HalfDollar} = .50;

print "<br />\n";
while (my ($key, $value) = each(%coins)){
     print "$key, $value<br />\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! The first suggestion will work nicely I think. –  user1758367 Feb 19 '13 at 12:29

default hashes don't preserve order - that's the very nature of hashes. You could use a module like Tie::IxHash to preserve the order the items were added.

share|improve this answer

I have come up with a solution without any need of using Tie::IxHash.

The approach is to add a character/number before the key of the hash.

This will allow us to get the order in which we pushed keys in the hash when keys will be sorted.

Here's the code:

#!/usr/perl/bin -w    
use strict;
use Data::Dumper;

my %hash = ();

my @keys = qw(one two three);
my $count = 0;

for(my $i=0; $i<scalar(@keys); $i++) {
    $hash{ chr($count) . $keys[$i] } = 1;
    $count++;
}

foreach my $key (sort { ord $a <=> ord $b } keys(%hash) ) {
    print substr($key, 1) . " => " . $hash{$key}. "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This will only work for up to ten elements! You could change this to MAXINT elements by encoding the count as a pseudo-codepoint. Change to $hash{ chr($count) . $keys[$i] }, sort { ord $a <=> ord $b }. The ord function will return the ord of the first char if a string with length > 1 is given. –  amon Feb 19 '13 at 11:52
    
Made the changes. Thanks @amon. –  Krishnachandra Sharma Feb 19 '13 at 11:57

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