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interface IDependency
{
    string Baz { get; set; }
}

class Foo
{
    IDependency dependency;

    public Foo(IDependency dependency)
    {
        this.dependency = dependency;
    }

    public void FubarBaz()
    {
        dependency.Baz = "fubar";
    }
}

I could also implement this as:

class FooStatic
{
    public static void FubarBaz(IDependency dependency)
    {
        dependency.Baz = "fubar";
    }
}

When should I choose immutable objects over static methods? Are there any situations where the reverse might be true?

Also, it seems to me that immutable objects should not have void methods. What do you think?

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2  
Your example is kind of icky- you have a class who's only purpose in life is to change some state in an instance of a different class. One nice thing about OOP is that it classes can limit the scope of state. –  RossFabricant Sep 29 '09 at 23:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Immutable objects can certainly have void methods - there are other kinds of side-effects beyond changing the state of an object. Consider:

public void WriteTo(Stream stream)

as an example.

As for your "immutable objects vs static methods" issue - what if your method actually needs a few aspects of the state of Foo? Just because the state doesn't change doesn't mean that it doesn't make sense to encapsulate that state together. Suppose it has 5 dependencies instead of one - do you want to write lots of static methods that take 5 parameters? When you gain a sixth dependency (or even just another piece of state) do you really want to have to add the sixth parameter to all the methods, or just to the constructor?

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Thanks for the reply; declaring dependencies the ctor seems reasonable enough to me. In response to your first paragraph, though, doesn't WriteTo modify the state of stream? –  Sam Pearson Sep 30 '09 at 0:17
    
@Sam: Yes, it modifies the state of the stream - but not the state of the object you call it on. The stream is mutable, but the object could be immutable... so it's still a void method on an immutable object, without being pointless. –  Jon Skeet Sep 30 '09 at 6:49

FubarBaz() mutates the member Foo.dependency therefore Foo is not immutable. Immutability is a design constraint that can and should be better expressed in C# by marking fields readonly. The wireup of your dependency can and should be done in the constructor (if you are doing IoC most frameworks will require this). An immutable design could end up like this:

class Foo
{
    private readonly IDependency dependency;

    public Foo(IDependency dependency)
    {
        this.dependency = dependency;
        dependency.Baz = "fubar";
    }
}

There is a time and a place for both mutable and immutable class designs. Maybe a value changes frequently and the class is not shared, then a mutable class works. Immutability has the advantage of being invariant. You can pass a reference to the object around and be assured the value it points to never changes. This is a powerful concept especially when dealing with multi-threaded applications.

The decision to use a static class should be based on how you want calls to look or if you absolutely need to use a static such as is the case when creating extension methods. IME, writing a call before implementing a call is a great way to decide on the design before wiring up the implementation. Statics are basically the same thing as non-statics except a static cannot be "new'd up" (constructed by you). Statics are not immutable particularly because you don't construct them. You just have the one instance to deal with.

I see no reason to avoid void return types on methods in an immutable class design.

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