Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a python script that periodically queries a mysql database for data (using sqlalchemy 0.7.4). It does so by running a stored procedure. If the procedure returns anything, the script will attempt to process the data (this part has nothing to do with the DB) and then save the results back using a second procedure.

After this it will sleep for a certain amount of time (usually for a minute) and to it all again until stopped. It should be capable of running for weeks.

I will often get this error: “Can't reconnect until invalid transaction is rolled back”. I've made some changes using all kinds of info I could find about this and I'm wondering if this is a good way of achieving what I want:

from sqlalchemy import create_engine, exc
from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker
from sqlalchemy import text, func
import time

class StoredProcedures():
    _engine = None
    _connection = None
    _session = None

    def __init__(self, cs):
        self._engine = create_engine(cs, encoding='utf-8', echo=False, pool_recycle=600)
        self._connection = self._engine.connect()
        Session = sessionmaker(bind=self._engine)
        self._session = Session()

    def sp_test_1(self, user_id):
        t = self._session.begin(subtransactions=True)

        try:
            query = 'call sp_get_files(%d)'%user_id
            result = self._session.execute(query).fetchall()
            t.close()
            return result
        except exc.DBAPIError, e: #Proper way of reconnecting?
            t.rollback()
            time.sleep(5)
            self._connection = self._engine.connect()
            Session = sessionmaker(bind=self._engine)
            self._session = Session()
        except:
            t.rollback()

        return None


cs = "mysql://test:test@127.0.0.1/test_db"
db_stored_procedures = StoredProcedures(cs)

while (True):
    files = db_stored_procedures.sp_test_1(1)
    if len(files) > 0:
        print "This is where processing happens"
        #And this is where the second procedure would be called to store the results
    time.sleep(15)

I have tested this but I pretty much just wrote it so I haven't done any long term testing. I'd like your opinions first.

EDIT: Originally I used the connection to execute the query, like so (omitted most of the script that was the same as the above one):

def sp_test_1(self, user_id):
    t = self._connection.begin()

    try:
        query = 'call sp_get_files(%d)'%user_id
        result = self._connection.execute(query).fetchall()
        t.close()
        return result
    except exc.DBAPIError, e:
        #same as above
    except:
        t.rollback()

    return None
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You're using a Session interface, which uses a Transaction object internally so I don't think you need to do your own transaction management.

I don't see much need for anything beyond a simple:

def sp_test_1(self, user_id):

    query = 'call sp_get_files(%d)'%user_id
    result = self._session.execute(query).fetchall()
    return result

If that generates the same exception, it would be useful if you post the full stack trace. Exceptions are friends and not adversaries. :)

share|improve this answer
    
I'll try to give you the stack trace, but this happens sporadically and I can't always replicate it. I also have another problem with stored procedures but I think that is better suited for a new question. –  gkres Feb 19 '13 at 14:57
    
If it's sporadic I'd take a long hard look at the MySQL log. –  JosefAssad Feb 19 '13 at 14:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.