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I have a table in Oracle named MESSAGE and it has a column TERMINALID (VARCHAR2 8 NOT NULL); and there is an index for this column. There are about 300,000,000 records in this table.

Now, this works fine (0.0 seconds):

using (var con = new OracleConnection(connectionString2))
{
    try
    {
        con.Open();

        var parameters = new DynamicParameters();
        parameters.Add("PTerminalId", value: "04447777", dbType: System.Data.DbType.AnsiString);
        Console.WriteLine("ora - messages #{0}", con.Query<decimal>("SELECT COUNT(*) FROM MESSAGE WHERE TERMINALID=:PTerminalId", param: parameters).FirstOrDefault());
    }
    finally { con.Close(); }
}

And this fails (times out):

using (var con = new OracleConnection(Properties.Settings.Default.GSMConnectionString2))
{
    try
    {
        con.Open();

        Console.WriteLine("ora - messages #{0}", con.Query<decimal>("SELECT COUNT(*) FROM GSM.MESSAGE WHERE TERMINALID=:PTerminalId", param: new { PTerminalId = "04447777" }).FirstOrDefault());
    }
    finally { con.Close(); }
}

Why it's so?

share|improve this question
    
First code runs in 0.0 seconds; second code times out. –  Kaveh Shahbazian Feb 19 '13 at 12:03
    
Is there a way to specify the datatype of the parameter in the second query? –  Vincent Malgrat Feb 19 '13 at 12:12
    
No; and I don't like it. –  Kaveh Shahbazian Feb 19 '13 at 12:30
1  
It might be the reason why the first query uses the index and the second doesn't: a datatype mismatch can make indexes unusable. A SQL trace of both queries would likely provide an explanation. –  Vincent Malgrat Feb 19 '13 at 12:52
    
Tnx; That sounds like the cause. I'll try it on a table with fewer records to see if it actually returns something and report back. –  Kaveh Shahbazian Feb 19 '13 at 12:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Basically: what @Vincent said: a datatype mismatch can make indexes unusable.

Without additional information, dapper makes some assumptions. One of those assumptions is that your string is going to continue to be unicode at the database, so it defaults to DbType.String. In most cases this is either correct or adequate, but it can misbehave in some scenarios - which is why we also provide the facility (via DynamicParameters) to be more explicit about both the type and length of the string parameter to add.

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