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I have the following come in C:

int x = 0;
int *a = &x;

void foo(int *a)
{
    static int x = 0;
    x++;
    *a += x;
    a = &x;
    *a = x + 10;
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    foo(a);
    foo(a);
    printf("%d\n", *a);

    return 0;
}

I can clearly debug it and see that the line *a += x doesn't do anything plus I can see that the value of x just a second before going out of the function is 22 and it prints out 13.

When I did it in my head, I've go 34, which should be the right answer as far as I can see. Can somebody explain where I might be wrong?

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1  
You have a global variable x and then one local in your foo function. They conflict. Change the name of one of them. – Tony The Lion Feb 19 '13 at 11:04
    
I know that the conflict, I want to know the output of this specific program. That was an interview question. – Vadiklk Feb 19 '13 at 11:05
    
this works exactly as it should be. – phoeagon Feb 19 '13 at 11:09
    
and where is the problem? You are modifing the value of a that is on the stack... if you want to modify the global pointer a you should have **a as a function parameter... – neagoegab Feb 19 '13 at 11:10
1  
Just remember that 'a' changes from pointing to the global 'x' to pointing to the static 'x' on the first call to the fucnction :D – user995502 Feb 19 '13 at 11:11
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Let's do it step by step.

First round:

int x = 0; // global "x"

static int x = 0; // local "x" = 0
x++; // local "x" = 1
*a += x; // global "x" += local "x" results in global "x" = 1
a = &x; // local "a" points to local "x"
*a = x + 10; // local "x" = local "x" + 10 results in local "x" = 11

Second round:

int x = 0; // global "x" = 1 now

static int x = 0; // local "x" = 11 now
x++; // local "x" = 12
*a += x; // global "x" += local "x" results in global "x" = 13
a = &x; // local "a" points to local "x"
*a = x + 10; // local "x" = local "x" + 10 results in local "x" = 22

printf("%d\n", *a); // prints global "x", 13
share|improve this answer
    
Spot on!! Thanks for the great answer, now I understand! – Vadiklk Feb 19 '13 at 11:17
    
a great and patient solution. although a static variable is local only in the sense of name lookup. Technically it is closer to a global variable. – phoeagon Feb 19 '13 at 11:20
    
@phoeagon You're right. I know. – Alexey Frunze Feb 19 '13 at 11:23

It's easy. The tricky part is to recognize the different copies of x, and the scope of a inside the function.

void foo(int *a)
{
    static int x = 0;
    x++;
    *a += x;
     a = &x;   //<==== this doesn't change the a outside you see, a now points to static x
    *a = x + 10;
 }

Single stepping it in a gdb should tell you what actually happens. Just notice that on the line marked above, the static int x is changed. so the *a=x+10; actually changes the static int x. So after the first iteration:

Global x=1 static x=11

So in the second iteration static x is incremented to 12, then global x=1+12;. this makes global x==13. The rest of the code doesn't affect global x and global a anymore. The foo then simply adds the static x by 10, which is irrelevant to the global variable.

share|improve this answer
    
If it is 11, why does it print 13? Also, when debugging I saw that the global x changes a lot! It was 22 last time I checked. – Vadiklk Feb 19 '13 at 11:15
    
@Vadiklk after the first iteration, global x is 1 and static x is 11. If you understand that, the second execution of foo is similar and you can understand the result. – phoeagon Feb 19 '13 at 11:17
    
Yeah, I see it now :D thanks! – Vadiklk Feb 19 '13 at 11:18

This makes it easier to see

int x = 0;
int *a = &x;

void foo(int *a)
{
    static int y = 0;
    y++;
    *a += y;

      a = &y;        // a doesn't point to x anymore!!!
    *a = y + 10;
}
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    foo(a);
    foo(a); // Now 'a' again points to the global 'x' (once more) 
    printf("%d\n", *a);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 because of local a... local a doesn't point to X anymore... global a still points to x. – neagoegab Feb 19 '13 at 11:17
    
here: foo(int *a) -> /*this a is local*/ – neagoegab Feb 19 '13 at 11:20
    
@neagoegab Are you basically saying that the comment is in the wrong place? – Alexey Frunze Feb 19 '13 at 11:21
    
@M.Alem You could also rename the parameter a to b for more clarity. – Alexey Frunze Feb 19 '13 at 11:23
    
@AlexeyFrunze: also the comment is wrong – neagoegab Feb 19 '13 at 11:23

Since C uses static scope, when there are two variables with the same name, it will be used first the one declared in the current block, then it will look at external blocks. So static int x shadows the global variable x. Also another thing that you should note is that in C arguments are passed by value, so if you assign a copy of the value you don't affect the original value.

Let's imagine a case where the global variable x has address 0x8000 , and the static variable x is at address 0x9000. This is what happens at the first call:

void foo(int *a)  // a= 0x8000 , global int x=0
{
    static int x = 0;
    x++;         // static int x=1
    *a += x;     // global int x=1
    a = &x;      // a=0x9000 (only a copy of a is assigned, so the global a will remain 0x8000)
    *a = x + 10;     // static int x= 11
}

And this is what happens in the second call:

void foo(int *a)  // a= 0x8000 , global int x=1, static int x=11
{
    static int x = 0;
    x++;         // static int x=12
    *a += x;     // global int x= 13
    a = &x;      // a=0x9000
    *a = x + 10;     // static int x= 22
}
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