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I have a table with 15 million records holding some informations (current speed, gas usage, ...) of our machinery.
Current speed is stored per minute, gas usage every 15 minutes. Now I need a list with gas usage and the average speed in this 15 minute intervall.

select a.time, a.value as gas, 
(select avg(b.value) from machine_values as b where b.time < a.time 
  and b.time > date_add(a.time, interval -15 minute) and b.channel='speed') as avgSpeed 
from machine_values as a 
where a.time >= '2012-12-16 00:00:00.000' and a.time < '2012-12-17 00:00:00.000' 
and a.channel='gas'

machine_values.time and machine_values.channel are primary keys in this table.

Just tried this with values of one day but the query runs about half an hour. If I add the one day time period the subquery the query runs much faster:

select a.time, a.value as gas, 
(select avg(b.value) from machine_values as b where b.time < a.time 
  and b.time > date_add(a.time, interval -15 minute) and b.channel='speed'
  and b.time >= '2012-12-16 00:00:00.000' and b.time < '2012-12-17 00:00:00.000') as avgSpeed 
from machine_values as a 
where a.time >= '2012-12-16 00:00:00.000' and a.time < '2012-12-17 00:00:00.000' 
and a.channel='gas'

But that's only for one day. If I try this for two months it takes about an hour to get the results. What's wrong? Doesn't the subquery refer to a.time on a per-row-base?

I presumed that - if I have one row with a.time = 2012-12-16 00:20:00 and a.gas = 100 the subquery would only select the values from 2012-12-16 00:05:00 until 2012-12-16 00:20:00? But the performance of the query looks like that the subquery every time scans the whole table.

Is there another (faster) way to get the wanted results?

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