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Write a program to reverse the direction of a given singly-linked list. In other words, after the reversal all pointers should now point backwards.

I am trying to solve above problem. I wrote functions for insertion,search and deletion and printing for the singly linked list.

my print function is as follows

void print(list **l)
{
    list *p=*l;
    for(int i=0;p;i++)
    {
        cout<<p->item<<endl;
        p=p->next;
    }
}

it works fine printing all values in the list.

but in the main function if I do the same assignment like this

list *p=*l;

it gives me segmentation fault. my main function is as follow

main()
{
    list **l;
    *l=NULL;
    int n;
    while(cin>>n)
    insert(l,n);
    list *p=*l;
    list *prev=NULL;
    list *next;
    while(p)
    {
        next=p->next;
        p->next=prev;
        prev=p;
        if(next==NULL)
        *l=p;
        p=next;
    }       
    print(l);
}

my insert function is as follows

void insert(list **l,int x)
{
    list *p;
    p=(list *)malloc(sizeof(list));
    p->item=x;
    p->next=*l;
    *l=p;
}

what is the difference between the assignment I do in print function and the main function? why I don't get any error in print function and I get a segmentation fault in the main function?

if my function is like this

main()
{
    list **l;
    *l=NULL;
    int n;
    while(cin>>n)
    insert(l,n);
    print(l);
}

I am not getting any error I am able to insert and print values of the list.

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2  
list ** l;is a dangling pointer, so *l=NULL; is undefined behavior. –  enobayram Feb 19 '13 at 11:56
    
@enobayram I am inserting values right? –  user2086900 Feb 19 '13 at 11:58
    
Yes, you're performing an insertion in the insert function correctly, but your overall approach is inappropriate even for C, let alone C++. Is there any reason why you're not using std::list<int>? Even if you want to code like C, use list *l = NULL; and pass it around as print(&l). –  enobayram Feb 19 '13 at 12:13
    
I know how to use list<int>, I am trying to solve the problem mentioned if I use list<int> I can't solve that right? –  user2086900 Feb 19 '13 at 12:18
    
Avoid malloc/free in C++, they can cause trouble since they aren't compatible with new/delete. –  Lundin Feb 19 '13 at 12:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When you write

list **l;
*l=NULL;

You're dereferencing an invalid pointer, so run into undefined behavior.

Inside the function, you're probably passing a valid pointer as argument. For example

list* l;
void print(&l)

In this case, &l is of type list** - and it points to a dangling list*, so dereferencing it will yield a pointer (l itself). l isn't initialized, but not reading from it is ok.

share|improve this answer
    
list *p=*l; if I remove this line I am not getting any error –  user2086900 Feb 19 '13 at 12:01
    
I updated my post, in the second case I am not getting any error. –  user2086900 Feb 19 '13 at 12:08
    
@user2086900 it's undefined behavior either way. The lines I pointed out are invalid. –  Luchian Grigore Feb 19 '13 at 12:11
1  
@user2086900 DO NOT rely on trial and error in C/C++. You'll be in very big trouble very soon. Most other languages guard you against certain types of errors, so most bugs are easily found, but in C/C++ messing with pointers can cause REALLY REALLY hard to find bugs. –  enobayram Feb 19 '13 at 12:22

You write:

list **l;
*l=NULL;

But l isn't assigned, you don't know it's value, so *l=NULL is undefined behaviour, since you don't know which area of memory you're changing.

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