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I can't find how to create the view matrix with yaw, pitch and roll. I'm working with LWJGL and have a rotate function available.

    viewMatrix.setZero();
    viewMatrix.rotate(pitch, new Vector3f(1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f));
    viewMatrix.rotate(yaw, new Vector3f(0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f));
    viewMatrix.rotate(roll, new Vector3f(0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f));
    viewMatrix.m33 = 1.0f;
    viewMatrix.translate(position);

I am doing something fundamentally wrong, and I hate the fact that I can't fix it do to the lack of documentation (or my lack of google skills).

I do not transpose the matrix.

As a note, position is a zero vector and I do not see anything on the screen (when view matrix is zero I do).

Added: I am trying to reach the equivalent of the following:

    GL11.glRotatef(pitch, 1.0f, 0.0f, 0.0f);
    GL11.glRotatef(yaw, 0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
    GL11.glRotatef(roll, 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);
    GL11.glTranslatef(position.x, position.y, position.z);
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The reason you don't see anything on the screen isn't necessarily related to wrong rotation algorithm (which looks ok). Does the .setZero() set the matrix to all zeros, or to identity matrix? –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 19 '13 at 13:34
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should use viewMatrix.setIdentity() instead of viewMatrix.setZero() to initially set the matrix to a unit matrix, instead of zeroing the matrix.

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Care to explain why this results in nothing being drawn? –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 19 '13 at 14:33
1  
Little bit rusty on the topic, but if I'm not mistaken: If you perform operations against a zeroed matrix, you'll just get a zeroed matrix back as anything multiplied by zero, equals zero. If you perform operations against the identity matrix, you'll be able to get non-zero numbers back as a matrix multiplied by the identity matrix returns the initial matrix. –  Quetzalcoatl Feb 19 '13 at 14:52
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compounding rotations like that is the wrong way to go about it, try this: http://tutorialrandom.blogspot.com/2012/08/how-to-rotate-in-3d-using-opengl-proper.html

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It would be nice to explain why this is bad, except for linking to random tutorial, which isn't a very good quality either. Also, it doesn't actually address the question. –  Bartek Banachewicz Feb 19 '13 at 13:32
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