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I know there are things like vb to c# converter apps out there, but what I'm looking for is a bit different. I need a converter to help me convert this "for" loop into a "while" loop. Here is the code I'm engineering for my "Integer Factory" (you can see the "for" loop towards the bottom - this is what needs to be converted). I have a few other loops, which is why I need an app for this (preferably wysiwyg). Thanks!

int IntegerBuilderFactory(string stringtobeconvertedbythefactory)
{
       string strtmp = stringtobeconvertedbythefactory;

       int customvariabletocontrolthethrottling;

       if (strtmp.Length > 0)
       {
              customvariabletocontrolthethrottling = 1;
       }
       else
       {
              customvariabletocontrolthethrottling = 0;
       }

       for (int integersforconversiontostrings = 0; integersforconversiontostrings < customvariabletocontrolthethrottling; integersforconversiontostrings++)
       {
              return int.Parse(strtmp);
       }

       try
       {             
              return 0;
       }
       catch (Exception ex)
       {
              // Add logging later, once the "try" is working correctly

              return 0;
       }
}
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closed as too localized by Will Feb 20 '13 at 15:34

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6  
You need an app that refactors "few for-loops" to while loops? Why can't you do it manually? –  Tim Schmelter Feb 19 '13 at 13:32
1  
Why is that even a for loop if it returns the very first element it converts? Did you attempt to simplify the code in some way or is this actual code you have? –  R0MANARMY Feb 19 '13 at 13:36
    
@R0MANARMY, this is real code that I've been working on for the past few days. I'm making it to streamline conversion processes. I'm using loops to improve security and memory efficiency. I'd be open to any suggestions you may have! –  Tropic Thunder Feb 19 '13 at 13:50
    
There's a whole site dedicated to code reviews, you might have more luck posting there and asking for advice. I am a little curious how you think using loops will improve security though. –  R0MANARMY Feb 19 '13 at 13:59
1  
It really took you several days to produce this horribly messy int.TryParse implementation, while still delegating all the actual work to the framework? No offense meant, but if that's true, you should probably rethink your job choice... And for a better (reduced IL size, reduced bugs, probably reduced memory size) implementation of that monster above, you should use the version in my answer. –  Nuffin Feb 19 '13 at 20:11

2 Answers 2

Every for loop (for(initializer;condition;iterator)body;) is essentially

{
    initializer;
    while(condition)
    {
        body;
        iterator;
    }
}

Now you can utilize this knowledge to create a code transformation for the refactoring tool of your choice.

By the way, that code looks awful...

int IntegerBuilderFactory(string stringToParse)
{
    int result;
    if(!int.TryParse(stringToParse, out result))
    {
        // insert logging here
        return 0;
    }

    return result;
}

done.

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Well, I cant necessarily rely on this logic for every instance though. I need an app that takes all considerations into account. –  Tropic Thunder Feb 19 '13 at 13:40
    
What considerations are there to take into account? I can't think of any, except for non compilable code... –  Nuffin Feb 19 '13 at 13:44
    
The place to be careful is with continue statements. In a for loop, the iteration statement will automatically be run. This is not the case for your transformed while loop. –  jerry Feb 19 '13 at 15:33
    
@jerry: indeed, didn't think of that. But this transformation usually doesn't make much sense anyway (except for demonstration purposes), so that shouldn't really matter (because when you need a for loop, a for loop is the way to go) –  Nuffin Feb 19 '13 at 15:42
    
@Nuffin: I agree, I've only come across it when teaching new programmers about for loops and continue and break statements –  jerry Feb 19 '13 at 17:29
int integersforconversiontostrings = 0;
while (integersforconversiontostrings < customvariabletocontrolthethrottling)
{
    return int.Parse(strtmp);
    integersforconversiontostrings++
}
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