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Suppose my classes have a method start() which acquires resources and stop() which releases resources. The start methods of a class may call start() methods of member objects. In case a start() of one of the member objects throws an exception, I have to make sure that stop() is called for all member objects for which start() has succeeded.

class X {
    public X ()
    {
        a = new A();
        b = new B();
        c = new C();
        d = new D();
    }

    public void start () throws Exception
    {
        try {
            a.start();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw e;
        }

        try {
            b.start();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            a.stop();
            throw e;
        }

        try {
            c.start();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            b.stop();
            a.stop();
            throw e;
        }

        try {
            d.start();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            c.stop();
            b.stop();
            a.stop();
            throw e;
        }
    }

    public void stop ()
    {
        d.stop();
        c.stop();
        b.stop();
        a.stop();
    }

    private A a;
    private B b;
    private C c;
    private D d;
}

Note the quadratic growth of cleanup code. What is the best way (least amount of code) to do the cleanup? In C I can do this easily with cleanup code at the bottom of the function and "goto" to jump to the appropriate place, but then Java doesn't have goto. Note that it is not permitted to call stop() on an object that hasn't been start()ed - I'm looking for a code that is exactly equivalent to the above but shorter.

So far the only solution I've come to is to use booleans to remember what was started, like this:

public void start () throws Exception
{
    boolean aStarted = false;
    boolean bStarted = false;
    boolean cStarted = false;
    boolean dStarted = false;

    try {
        a.start();
        aStarted = true;
        b.start();
        bStarted = true;
        c.start();
        cStarted = true;
        d.start();
        dStarted = true;
    } catch (Exception e) {
        if (dStarted) d.stop();
        if (cStarted) c.stop();
        if (bStarted) b.stop();
        if (aStarted) a.stop();
        throw e;
    }
}

I know about "finally" and "try-with-resources", but neither of these seem applicable here because the resources should not be released if there is no exception.

P.S. this is not a question about my use of exceptions, or my program design. This is specifically about cleaning up in case of failures in initialization code.

share|improve this question
    
What happens when you call stop on a non-started resource? –  assylias Feb 19 '13 at 14:11
    
I've mentioned "that it is not permitted to call stop() on an object that hasn't been start()ed". There may be an assert() in the start() and stop() functions for that. –  Ambroz Bizjak Feb 19 '13 at 14:12
2  
Make the stop() method more robust and just call it all the time. –  Boris the Spider Feb 19 '13 at 14:12
    
That would mean having to add a "boolean started" and "if (!started) { return; }" to every class. Which doesn't fit the "least amount of code" requirement. –  Ambroz Bizjak Feb 19 '13 at 14:14
    
what about a try/catch there? –  Boris the Spider Feb 19 '13 at 14:14

4 Answers 4

How about adding the things you started to a stack, then when you need to stop stuff, pop everything off the stack and stop it.

private Deque<Stoppable> toStop = new ArrayDeque<Stoppable>();

public void start() throws Exception {
  try {
    start(a);
    start(b);
    start(c);
    start(d);
  } catch (Exception e) {
    stop();
    throw e;
  }
}

private void start(Stoppable s) throws Exception {
  s.start();
  toStop.push(s);
}

public void stop() {
  while (toStop.size > 0) {
    toStop().pop().stop();
  }
}

This requires the stuff you start to have some sort of common stop() either through an interface or by subclassing, but I imagine its likely they already do.

share|improve this answer
    
don't forget to clear toStop after all are stopped. –  ogzd Feb 19 '13 at 14:18
    
@ogzd - good point –  Qwerky Feb 19 '13 at 14:21
    
this doesn't actually work as it is written, because the a.start() methods take arguments that would have to be passed through the start() wrapper. Also, the cleanup needs to happen in reverse order. –  Ambroz Bizjak Feb 19 '13 at 14:27
    
if it needs to happen in reverse order, just reverse the array and apply same procedure –  ogzd Feb 19 '13 at 14:36
    
@AmbrozBizjak - I changed the list to a stack, also note that the start method is overloaded. –  Qwerky Feb 19 '13 at 14:36
public class X
{
    private final List <Stoppable> stoppables = 
        new ArrayList <Stoppable> ();

    private void start (StartStoppable x)
    {
        x.start ();
        stoppables.add (x);
    }

    public void startAll ()
    {
        try
        {
            start (a);
            start (b);
            start (c);
            start (d);
        }
        catch (Throwable ex)
        {
            stopAll ();
            ex.printStackTrace ();
        }
    }

    public void stopAll ()
    {
        for (Stoppable s: stoppables)
        {
            try
            {
                s.stop ();
            }
            catch (Throwable ex)
            {
                ex.printStackTrace ();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you are ok with a linear explosion of code, you can use a start method structured like this:

public void start () throws Exception
{
    a.start();
    try {
        b.start();
        try {
            c.start();
            try {
                d.start();
            } catch (Exception e) {
                c.stop();
                throw e;
            }
        } catch (Exception e) {
            b.stop();
            throw e;
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        a.stop();
        throw e;
    }
}

If you have more than really a few items to start/stop, use a List like others suggested.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I was trying to avoid the nesting, you have to admit this looks ugly :) –  Ambroz Bizjak Feb 19 '13 at 14:24
up vote 0 down vote accepted

While I appreciate the all the ideas given, I don't find any of them suitable for widespread use my code. In particular, the stack/list based approach is problematic because of two reasons:

  1. The start() wrapper doesn't allow passing arguments to the start methods of the object it calls on.
  2. Everything would have to implement an interface like Stoppable. This is problematic because the technique needs to work for externally provided classes and functions, there may not be a start() method but something different.

The idea to just make stop() callable even if the object is not started is not suitable for the same reason - the interface may be out of programmer's control.

In the end I've settled for this, I find that it requires the least amount of boilerplate. An additional benefit is that the resulting stop() method can actually be called even if the object is not started (but this doesn't make the approach pointless because the start and stop functions of the members may be out of programmer's control).

class X {
    public X ()
    {
        a = new A();
        b = new B();
        c = new C();
        d = new D();
    }

    public void start () throws Exception
    {
        assert(state == 0);
        try {
            a.start();
            state = 1;
            b.start();
            state = 2;
            c.start();
            state = 3;
            d.start();
            state = 4;
        } catch (Exception e) {
            stop();
            throw e;
        }
    }

    public void stop ()
    {
        if (state >= 4) d.stop();
        if (state >= 3) c.stop();
        if (state >= 2) b.stop();
        if (state >= 1) a.stop();
        state = 0;
    }

    private int state;
    private A a;
    private B b;
    private C c;
    private D d;
}
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