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Sometimes, on my xp machines, I get an exception when calling a method in my auto-generated client proxy. I told the debugger to stop on all clr exceptions. Now sometimes when I call the following:

public MyStuff.Entities.Package GetPackageById(System.Guid sessionId, int packageId)
    {
        return base.Channel.GetPackageById(sessionId, packageId);
    }

I first get an InvalidOperationException: Collection was modified... Pressing F10 results in a FileLoadException with the following messge:

Could not load file or assembly 'System.Runtime.Serialization.resources, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=de-DE, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089' or one of its dependencies. An operation is not legal in the current state. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x80131509)

I'm sure the service didn't throw an exception because it would show up as a FaultException. Since it's an InvalidOperationException that's being thrown when calling base.Channel.GetPackageById(sessionId, packageId) I assume it's not directly my fault?

I'm slowly running out of ideas what I could try to eliminate or work around this exception.

It never happened when using my developer machine with windows 7 and .NET 4.5 installed on it. On XP this will happen 1 out of 4 times approximately.

GetPackageById on service side looks like this:

public Package GetPackageById(Guid sessionId, int packageId)
        {
            try
            {
                return DataProvider.Provider.GetPackagesByKey(packageId,null);
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                throw new FaultException<MySericeFault>(new MySericeFault(ex));
            }                        
        }

The Package Class looks like this:

    [DataContract(IsReference = true)]
    [KnownType(typeof(MyApp.Entities.MachinePackage))]
    public partial class Package: INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
    private DateTime? _outDate;
    [DataMember]
    public DateTime? OutDate
    {
        get { return _outDate; }
        set
        {
            if (_outDate != value)
            {
                _outDate = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("OutDate");
            }
        }
    }

    private int _productId;
    [DataMember]
    public int ProductId
    {
        get { return _productId; }
        set
        {
            if (_productId != value)
            {
                _productId = value;
                OnPropertyChanged("ProductId");
            }
        }
    }
    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(String propertyName)
    {
        if (_propertyChanged != null)
        {
            _propertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
    event PropertyChangedEventHandler INotifyPropertyChanged.PropertyChanged
    {
        add { _propertyChanged += value; } 
        remove { _propertyChanged -= value; }
    }
    private event PropertyChangedEventHandler _propertyChanged;
    }
share|improve this question
    
It sounds as though the WCF connection is being terminated abnormally and could be that the object being serialised is failing. Do you have code that shows object being serialised so we can check properties etc. Often circular references can cause this type of issue. –  Belogix Feb 19 '13 at 14:47
    
How do you close the connection to the service? And how is that handle when you get the first exception? I think you need to post mode code get get a dead on answer! –  Jocke Feb 19 '13 at 14:48
    
As written in the first sentence it is auto-generated with svcutil (.NET 4) –  Steven S. Feb 19 '13 at 14:48
    
Could you post the content of the GetPackageById method? –  Alex Filipovici Feb 19 '13 at 14:51
    
@Jocke: I close it like suggested by microsoft: try{...client.close}catch{client.abort} –  Steven S. Feb 19 '13 at 15:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is more of an experiment but too big to put as a comment!

Try creating a new operation contract that performs this code:

Service:

public Package GetPackageByIdTest(Guid sessionId, int packageId)
{
    return new Package { ProductId = packageId, OutDate = DateTime.Now };
}

Then create a console application that references your service and write something like this:

Client:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    for (int tester = 0; tester < 2000; tester++)
    {
        using (var service = new ConsoleApplication1.ServiceReference1.Service1Client())
        {
            Package result = service.GetPackageByIdTest(Guid.NewGuid(), tester);
            Console.WriteLine(result.ProductId);
        }
    }

    Console.ReadKey();
    return;
}

Then, try running that on one of the known XP machines that fails and see if you get the same issue. If not it would suggest there is something going a miss in your DataProvider.Provider.GetPackagesByKey(...) method.

share|improve this answer
    
I am deliberately closing and re-opening the service to try and trip it up but I think it will work ok as I suspect the real issue is in the provider. –  Belogix Feb 19 '13 at 16:19
    
I'll try that today. Thanks. –  Steven S. Feb 20 '13 at 6:51
    
I used this to test my service calls and it turned out that my service is pretty robust. I ended up delaying some calls from the client at the start and now it works like a charm. I guess I'll have to leave it like this until Windows XP is really gone! Would it be legitimate to accept this as an answer, even though it doesn't really answer the question I initially asked? –  Steven S. Mar 1 '13 at 12:53
    
That really is down to you. If it helped lead you to the answer / solution I'd say yes but there are no hard / fast rules. –  Belogix Mar 1 '13 at 15:26

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