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I am new to Android development (I'm taking a class), so bear with me.

I have to use a TextWatcher to display edited text from an EditText widget into a TextView widget.

For example, if what was initially typed is edited (like if the user typed "Hoozledoofer" and then highlighted "zledoof" and finally typed "v" in its place), I would have to output the change first in the format:

'zledoof' => 'v'

This is shown on the first line of the TextView. Then, the second line would show the full text now present in the EditText widget:

Hoover

I'm not sure how to do this. I know I need to output the results in the afterTextChanged method. How do I save what was done, and still keep it outputting whatever is typed? Any advice?

Below is a TextWatcher example given in class:

protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.activity_main);

    txtEdit = (EditText) findViewById(R.id.editText1);
    viewText = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.text);

     txtEdit.addTextChangedListener (new TextWatcher() {

          public void beforeTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int count, int after) {
              Log.i("TC", "beforeTC " + s.toString() + " "
                      + s.subSequence(start, start + count).toString());
          }

          public void onTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int before, int count) {
              Log.i("TC", "onTC " + s.toString() + " "
                      + s.subSequence(start, start + count).toString());
          }

          public void afterTextChanged(Editable s) {
              Log.i("TC", "afterTC " + s.toString());
          }
     });
}

Here's what I've tried which provides the intended final result, but it does keep on showing every little edit made. This may not be an issue and may work for the professor:

     txtEdit.addTextChangedListener (new TextWatcher() {

         String changed, newStr, edit;

          public void beforeTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int count, int after) {
              changed = s.subSequence(start, start + count).toString();

              //Log.i("TC", "beforeTC " + s.toString() + " "
                      //+ s.subSequence(start, start + count).toString());
          }

          public void onTextChanged(CharSequence s, int start, int before, int count) {
              newStr = s.toString();
              edit = s.subSequence(start, start + count).toString();

              //Log.i("TC", "onTC " + s.toString() + " "
                      //+ s.subSequence(start, start + count).toString());
          }

          public void afterTextChanged(Editable s) {
              viewText.setText(changed + " => " + edit + "\n" + newStr);

              //Log.i("TC", "afterTC " + s.toString());

          }
     });
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1  
That is a great example your teacher gave you! With it you can see every play-by-play change in your LogCat. It seems to me if you play around the EditText (enter random characters, move the cursor, delete things) you'll learn how the three methods work far better and faster than anyone could explain it... –  Sam Feb 19 '13 at 16:05
    
Thanks! However, I'm not really sure how to access the LogCat to see these changes. –  The Rationalist Feb 19 '13 at 16:06
1  
I see, that would be a problem. :) Are you using Eclipse? Go to Window > Show View > Other... then Android > LogCat (obviously don't use the deprecated version.) –  Sam Feb 19 '13 at 16:10
    
Thank you @Sam. Your direction really helped. I think I'm getting it now after watching it in the log. –  The Rationalist Feb 19 '13 at 16:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since this is homework I won't give you the answer. (Your teacher did much of the busy work by giving you a good example to start with.) But I'll give you a hint:

For example, if what was initially typed is edited (like if the user typed "Hoozledoofer" and then highlighted "zledoof" and finally typed "v" in its place), I would have to output the change first in the format: 'zledoof' => 'v' This is shown on the first line of the TextView.

Pay attention to before and after relative to count. This will help you know when the user is adding or subtracting text.

The second part is easy and you seem to have the answer already:

Then, the second line would show the full text now present in the EditText widget: Hoover
I know I need to output the results in the afterTextChanged method.

share|improve this answer
    
If you feel so inclined to see it, I posted my new code at the bottom of my original code. It does give the final result as intended, but it constantly updates with every keystroke. I'm not sure if that's a desired effect or not. I don't think I grasp your hint on using before and after relative to count. I can't think of a reason to use them. :( –  The Rationalist Feb 19 '13 at 16:58
1  
I believe your professor wants to see the every change, as you noticed TextWatchers are called a lot and unless you ignore input you cannot limit this. (Of course I have no idea what the assignment is, so if you have a question it would be best to ask your teacher.) It looks like you found a solution without needing before or after, so feel free to ignore that part of my advice. Your solution is simple and concise, well done! (Hmm, what is the difference between newStr and s in afterTextChanged()?) –  Sam Feb 19 '13 at 17:37
    
Thanks for your help. And I do believe newStr is redundant and I could probably do away with it. lol. I didn't think about that. –  The Rationalist Feb 19 '13 at 17:41

Another thing to be very careful with, is to not change the CharSequence in the beforeTextChanged or onTextChanged callbacks, as well as note that if the CharSequence is changed in the afterTextChanged callback that it will cause another call to the series of callbacks(infinite recursion is possible if not careful).

TextWatcher doc: http://developer.android.com/reference/android/text/TextWatcher.html

EDIT: I don't think you will need to worry about this, thought you were initially writing it to the EditText, but I now see that you are writing the changes to a TextView, still doesn't hurt to keep in the back of your mind though.

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