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The following code compiles with clang (libc++) and fails with gcc (libstdc++). Why does gcc (libstdc++) complains about an initializer list? I thought the return argument was using uniform initialization syntax.

std::tuple<double,double> dummy() {
  return {2.0, 3.0};
}

int main() {   
  std::tuple<double,double> a = dummy();   
  return 0;
}

Error: line 22: converting to ‘std::tuple’ from initializer \ list would use explicit constructor ‘constexpr std::tuple<_T1, _T2>::tuple(_U1&\ &, _U2&&) [with _U1 = double; _U2 = double; = void; _T\ 1 = double; _T2 = double]’

Note: GCC (libstdc++) (and clang (libc++)) accept

std::tuple<double,double> dummy {1.0, 2.0};

Isn't it the same case?

Update: this is a libc++ extension, see http://llvm.org/bugs/show_bug.cgi?id=15299 and also answer by Howard Hinnant below.

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Just commenting on your last question: No, it's not the same case. A return statement is a "copy initialization" context whereas your last example is actually a "direct initialization". The difference between both is that for copy initialization only non-explicit constructors are considered. –  sellibitze Feb 20 '13 at 14:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Unlike for pair<>, implicit construction of a tuple<> is not possible unfortunately. You have to use make_tuple():

#include <tuple>

std::tuple<double,double> dummy()
{
    return std::make_tuple(2.0, 3.0); // OK
}

int main() 
{   
    std::tuple<double,double> a = dummy();   
    return 0;
}

std::tuple has a variadic constructor, but it is marked as explicit. Thus, it cannot be used in this situation, where a temporary must be implicitly constructible. Per Paragraph 20.4.2 of the C++11 Standard:

namespace std {
    template <class... Types>
    class tuple {
    public:

        [...]
        explicit tuple(const Types&...); // Marked as explicit!

        template <class... UTypes>
        explicit tuple(UTypes&&...);     // Marked as explicit!

For the same reason it is illegal to use copy-initialization syntax for initializing tuples:

std::tuple<double, double> a = {1.0, 2.0}; // ERROR!
std::tuple<double, double> a{1.0, 2.0}; // OK

Or to construct a tuple implicitly when passing it as an argument to a function:

void f(std::tuple<double, double> t) { ... }
...
f({1.0, 2.0}); // ERROR!
f(make_tuple(1.0, 2.0)); // OK

Accordingly, if you construct your std::tuple explicitly when returning it in dummy(), no compilation error will occur:

#include <tuple>

std::tuple<double,double> dummy()
{
    return std::tuple<double, double>{2.0, 3.0}; // OK
}

int main() 
{   
    std::tuple<double,double> a = dummy();   
    return 0;
}
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2  
So clang is wrong to accept this? I thought the return type could be initialized using uniform initialization (not an initializer list). –  gnzlbg Feb 19 '13 at 16:03
4  
We should write a petition to the committee to make it non explicit for all arities > 1... –  PlasmaHH Feb 19 '13 at 16:08
3  
@JonathanWakely: while I agree that the return statement is explicit enough w.r.t the type to be selected, I still see no reason for the constructor of std::tuple to be explicit for arities > 1. –  Matthieu M. Feb 19 '13 at 16:25
4  
@JonathanWakely: On the other hand if you have a function accepting a tuple (foo(tuple<int, double, string>)), I would like to be able to call it this way: foo({3, 3.0, "3"}). –  Andy Prowl Feb 19 '13 at 16:30
1  
@Yakk: Yours is an interesting argument, but I think the programmer of the variadic template would have to take this into account: they should know their function could work on tuples on any arity, thus they should construct it explicitly - or rely on the mechanism Jonathan Wakely is proposing. On the other hand, I'd still like to be able to construct a tuple implicitly for passing it as an argument. For me, the two things are not mutually exclusive: the constructor could be made explicit and we could have a general way of specifying that we are "using an explicit constructor" –  Andy Prowl Feb 19 '13 at 18:23

The answer Andy Prowl gives is correct. I wanted to comment on the libc++ implementation, and the comment format does not allow me enough room or formatting choices.

Daniel Krügler and I had a conversation about a year ago on this subject, and he convinced me that this issue was worthy putting an extension into libc++ to get field experience with. And so far the feedback has been positive. However I want to make clear: This is not as simple as removing explicit from the ctor explicit constexpr tuple(UTypes&&...).

Daniel's plan is to give tuple a constructor that perfectly respects each element's implicit/explicit construction. And if every element will construct implicitly from every argument in the initializer list, then the tuple construction is implicit, else it will be explicit.

For example:

Given:

#include <tuple>

struct A
{
};

struct B
{
    B() = default;
    B(A);
};

struct C
{
    C() = default;
    explicit C(A);
};

Then:

std::tuple<>
test0()
{
    return {};  // ok
}

Nothing much to say about that one. But also this is ok:

std::tuple<B>
test1B()
{
    return {A()};  // ok B(A) implicit
}

because the conversion from A to B is implicit. However the following is a compile time error:

std::tuple<C>
test1C()
{
    return {A()};  // error, C(A) is explicit
}

because the conversion from A to C is explicit. This logic continues for multi-element tuples. For an implicit conversion to happen, every element must have an implicit conversion from the argument list:

std::tuple<A, B>
test2B()
{
    return {A(), A()};  // ok each element has implicit ctor
}

std::tuple<A, C>
test2C()
{
    return {A(), A()};  // error, C(A) is explicit
}

I should emphasize: This is a libc++ extension at this time.

Update

chico made a good suggestion that I update this answer:

Since this answer was given, Daniel Krügler wrote a paper and presented it to the C++ committee in Bristol this past April. Although the paper was well received, it was reviewed too late in the week to vote it into the current working draft.

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Is there a way to disable such extensions in libc++, in order to help keep code portable? –  bames53 Feb 22 '13 at 19:22
    
Not at this time. However note that the effort to port is a compile-time error followed by a trivial fix. –  Howard Hinnant Feb 22 '13 at 19:51
    
Do you maintain a list of libc++ extensions? I didn't see anything in a quick look through the libc++ source and I understand you do a fair bit of experimenting. --- It's true that the once-off porting effort is trivial, but if one is doing continuous integration with build bots on half a dozen platforms it's more convenient to have your work platform flag things. Not that I'm arguing this deserves some special attention; if it were really important libc++ is open source and I could work on this myself... –  bames53 Feb 22 '13 at 21:17
    
No, I don't, and that's a good suggestion. Though off the top of my head I can't think of another one besides this one. Oh, allocator<T>::propagate_on_container_move_assignment is true_type. Sometimes I just get irritated. ;-) Though this one has already made it into the WP for the next standard: cplusplus.github.com/LWG/lwg-defects.html#2103 –  Howard Hinnant Feb 22 '13 at 21:57
1  
I think it's worth mentioning the proposal in the answer. –  pepper_chico May 23 '13 at 22:43

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