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I am curious to understand the possible ways to echo the files in folders and subfolders and generate a output stating the filenames, which are picked up to delete X days old.

I wanted to write this script in two different levels

Level1: PowerShell script only to echo filenames and give me the output of the files, which have been identified to be deleted. This should include the files including folders and subfolders.

Level2: Combine the level1 script by adding a delete functionality, which would delete the files in folders and subfolders.

I have a move script and a direct script to delete but I want to ensure the correct files are picked and I want to know the file names which are being deleted.

Any help is highly appreciated.

EDIT Added from comment

I have been trying something like this in a very simple fashion

Get-ChildItem -Path c:\test | where {$_.lastWriteTime -lt (Get-Date).addDays(-60)} 

I would like to add some parameter, which would generate an output of filenames in a different folder location.

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Please add more content to the question and show that you at least performed some rudimentary effort. This is not a place where people will write scripts for you, but help you fix and better understand them. –  Christopher Ranney Feb 19 '13 at 16:18
    
sure Christopher...I completely agree to your words and respect this forum. I would not go beyond the scopes of the forum. I have been trying something like this in a very simple fashion Get-ChildItem -Path c:\test | where {$_.lastWriteTime -lt (Get-Date).addDays(-60)} I would like to add some parameter, which would generate an output of filenames in a different folder location. Thanks in advance..... –  user1926332 Feb 19 '13 at 17:27
    
This is still unclear. Do you want to provide ex. path as a function parameter? What would the output look like? What is "filenames in a different folder location"? Provide samples in the question, not the comments –  Frode F. Feb 19 '13 at 18:02
    
@ Graimer, yes I want to provide path as a function parameter and the output would like the names of the files, which are picked up older than X days to delete. Lets say. I am using Get-ChildItem -Path c:\test | where {$_.lastWriteTime -lt (Get-Date).addDays(-60)} this would read the files which are older than X days but would not generate any output of the file names. To be very clear, I would need an output of the filenames, which are being picked up to delete. –  user1926332 Feb 20 '13 at 4:40
    
To add on to the above comment, I am looking to have an output in different location. If i am still being unclear, please let me know.... –  user1926332 Feb 20 '13 at 4:44
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2 Answers

I think this is something along the lines of what you need, I have introduced you to a few concepts which you might not be aware of, such as cmdletbinding which allows you to dry run your script using the -whatif parameter. You can also supply -verbose to see what is happening along the way, you could also append to a log at this point using the Add-Content cmdlet.

So you might run it like this:

.\DeleteOldFiles.ps1 -Path c:\test -Age 50 -WhatIf -Verbose

Then when you are ready to delete the files you can run it without the -WhatIf parameter:

.\DeleteOldFiles.ps1 -Path c:\test -Age 50 -Verbose

This doesn't answer all your questions, but should help you get started, I've put plenty of comments in the code so you should be able to follow it all.

# Add CmdletBinding to support -Verbose and -WhatIf 
[CmdletBinding(SupportsShouldProcess=$True)]
param
(
    # Mandatory parameter including a test that the folder exists       
    [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
    [ValidateScript({Test-Path $_ -PathType 'Container'})] 
    [string] 
    $Path,

    # Optional parameter with a default of 60
    [int] 
    $Age = 60   
)

# Identify the items, and loop around each one
Get-ChildItem -Path $Path | where {$_.lastWriteTime -lt (Get-Date).addDays(-$Age)} | ForEach-Object {

    # display what is happening 
    Write-Verbose "Deleting $_ [$($_.lastWriteTime)]"

    # delete the item (whatif will do a dry run)
    $_ | Remove-Item
}
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The question is a little vague, but I assume this is something like what you want.
I like David Martin's answer, but it may be a little too complex depending on your skill level and needs.

param(
    [string]$Path,
    [switch]$LogDeletions
)

foreach($Item in $(Get-ChildItem -Path $Path | where {$_.lastWriteTime -lt (Get-Date).addDays(-60)}))
{
    if($LogDeletions)
    {
        $Item | Out-File "C:\Deleted.Log" -Append
    }
    rm $Item
}
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