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I have written a C# application that uses HttpListener to listen for HTTP requests -obviously! The namespace prefix I use is also registered using netsh for the current user (as suggested by everyone on SO).

The problem is despite using netsh my application still throws an "access is denied" exception for non-admin users. The OS is Windows 7.

Update: It appears as though my application is not executing the netsh command when I run it with a non-admin user. Is there any problems with my code? There are no exceptions thrown.

    AddAddress("http://localhost:8400/", Environment.UserDomainName, Environment.UserName);

    HttpListener _listener = new HttpListener();
    _listener.Prefixes.Add("http://localhost:8400/");
    _listener.Start();

    ...

    /** method stolen from an SO thread. sorry can't remember the author **/
    static void AddAddress(string address, string domain, string user)
    {
        string args = string.Format(@"http add urlacl url={0}", address) + " user=\"" + domain + "\\" + user + "\"";

        ProcessStartInfo psi = new ProcessStartInfo("netsh", args);
        psi.Verb = "runas";
        psi.CreateNoWindow = true;
        psi.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;
        psi.UseShellExecute = true;

        Process.Start(psi).WaitForExit();
    }
share|improve this question
    
This is likely due to Windows 7 disallowing a usermode application from creating a listener on port 80 (which is default for HTTP). See this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/4115328/507793 – Matthew Feb 19 '13 at 17:02
    
Thanks. I am not using port 80. I also just posted my code. – user1936026 Feb 19 '13 at 17:07
1  
I suspect that your netsh is failing to add the mapping that you want. Or perhaps it's because you're using locolhast rather than localhost. Or is that just a typo in your question? – Jim Mischel Feb 19 '13 at 17:37
    
SO editor wouldn't let me type localhost, so I had to change it! Also when I run the same netsh command in the command prompt I get a message saying that the namespace is already registered. So I assume netsh was successful. – user1936026 Feb 19 '13 at 17:51
    
Enter netsh http show urlacl at the command prompt, and find the entry you made. Be sure that Listen is Yes. As I recall, you have to add "listen=true" after the user name. – Jim Mischel Feb 19 '13 at 17:59
up vote 15 down vote accepted

The line that I use when I'm doing an HttpListener is:

netsh http add urlacl http://+:8008/ user=Everyone listen=true

The user can be an individual user or a user group. So if you want only Administrators to have access, for example:

netsh http add urlacl http://+:8008/ user=Administrators listen=true

You can get help on the command:

netsh http add urlacl help
share|improve this answer
    
Well, user groups are not available on all Windows platforms according to here: windows.microsoft.com/en-CA/windows-vista/…. BUT, looks like user=Everyone did it!!! But where was this documented?!!!! I wasted 2 days on this! Is there a similar thing for httpcfg (for Win XP)? Thanks! – user1936026 Feb 20 '13 at 5:26
    
@user1936026: I'm not familiar with httpcfg, but if I had to work with it, I'd probably start with the examples at technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc786389(v=ws.10).aspx – Jim Mischel Feb 20 '13 at 12:19
6  
According to the help, listen takes a yes|no value not true|false. It wouldn't work for me with the listen=true. – tafoo85 Nov 5 '13 at 15:44
2  
@tafoo85: Older versions of Windows used true/false. Newer versions use yes/no. Or perhaps it was the other way around. Glad you found the fix. – Jim Mischel Nov 5 '13 at 16:56
    
Downvoter: It's customary to provide a reason for the downvote. – Jim Mischel Jan 3 '14 at 14:27

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