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Assume the following simple code:

public class Foo // : IFoo
{
    private string _field;

    public string Property
    {
        get { return _field; }
    }

    private void SetField()
    {
        _field = " foo ";
    }

    private string Method()
    {
        SetField();
        return Property.Trim();
    }
}

The static checker is able to prove that Property will be not null when Method uses it.

Now, I introduce an interface along with a contract and the static checker starts complaining: "Possibly calling a method on a null reference 'this.Property'.

Is this a bug or am I missing something?


The code with the interface looks like this:

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    private string _field;

    public string Property
    {
        get { return _field; }
    }

    private void SetField()
    {
        _field = " foo ";
    }

    private string Method()
    {
        SetField();
        return Property.Trim();
    }
}

[ContractClass(typeof(IFooContract))]
public interface IFoo
{
    string Property { get; }
}

[ContractClassFor(typeof(IFoo))]
public abstract class IFooContract : IFoo
{
    public string Property
    {
        get { throw new System.NotImplementedException(); }
    }
}

My settings are like this:

I get the following output:

[...]
C:\{path}\CC2.cs(11,19): message : CodeContracts: Suggested ensures: Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<System.String>() == this._field);
C:\{path}\CC2.cs(16,13): message : CodeContracts: Suggested ensures: Contract.Ensures(this._field != null);
C:\{path}\CC2.cs(21,13): message : CodeContracts: Suggested ensures: Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<System.String>() != null);
C:\{path}\CC2.cs(21,13): message : CodeContracts: Suggested ensures: Contract.Ensures(this._field != null);
C:\{path}\CC2.cs(21,13): message : CodeContracts: Suggested ensures: Contract.Ensures(this.Property.Trim() != null);
C:\{path}\CC2.cs(21,13): message : CodeContracts: Suggested ensures: Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<System.String>() == this.Property.Trim());
[...]
C:\{path}\CC3.cs(33,13): warning : CodeContracts: Possibly calling a method on a null reference 'this.Property'
[...]

I am using Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate with .NET 4 as target framework.

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I can't reproduce it with VS 2012 and VS 2010 compiled with C# 5 and 4 respectively. I have the same Code Contracts version and configuration. I only receive 8 Suggested ensures. Am I missing something? –  Ilya Ivanov Feb 19 '13 at 16:48
    
@IlyaIvanov: Did you compile the first or the second code snippet? Only the second snippet shows that behavior. Furthermore, please make sure that your settings are the same as mine. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 19 '13 at 16:50
    
I've made sure, that all is identical. Moreover, If I comment //SetField(); then I receive CodeContracts: Possibly calling a method on a null reference 'this.Property' –  Ilya Ivanov Feb 19 '13 at 16:51
    
@IlyaIvanov: Strange. Are you using the same version I am using? I updated my question with my output. Could you please compare? –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 19 '13 at 16:53
    
Yes, I have managed to reproduce in both 2010 and 2012. My fault of not uncommenting // : IFoo in first snippet. Seems to me like a bug. I will try to play with it –  Ilya Ivanov Feb 19 '13 at 17:02
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2 Answers 2

Not quite an answer, but some thoughts on the question. This is not that interface contract, which confuse Code Contracts. I've managed to reproduce this with simple example without ContractClass for interface. Just change second example to simple

//Foo's declaration

public interface IFoo
{
    string Property { get; }
}

And you will get the same error. Even adding Contract.Assume(_field != null); on Property field doesn't fix it (it will fix it adding this Assume to SetField method). I didn't manage to suppress null reference exception warning with Invariants either. The only thing that worked is quite an ugly solution, where you have to provide postcondition for interface contract and give Code Contract's a hint with assume in Property field. Full code is shown below

public class Foo  : IFoo
{
    private string _field;

    public string Property
    {
        get
        {
            Contract.Assume(_field != null);
            return _field;
        }
    }

    private void SetField()
    {
        _field = " foo ";

    }

    private string Method()
    {
        SetField();
        return Property.Trim();
    }
}

[ContractClass(typeof(IFooContract))]
public interface IFoo
{
    string Property { get; }
}

[ContractClassFor(typeof(IFoo))]
public abstract class IFooContract : IFoo
{
    public string Property
    {
        get
        {
            Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<string>() != null);
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }
}

Edit: As _field can be null, I suggest to use this method body to give hints to the analyser, so that it won't bother with null reference warning.

private string Method()
{
    SetField();
    Contract.Assume(Property != null);
    return Property.Trim();
}

p.s. as John Sonmez says at pluralsight training regarding Code contracts "Static analysis is a complex, mysterious task, which hardly can be worked out without hints to the analyser suing Assume method calls".

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for taking the time to investigate it. I am aware of the necessity of Contract.Assume. But it can't be used in this scenario, because Property is allowed to be null. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 19 '13 at 17:27
    
Could you check this using invariant in Interface contracts? I think you still need to use some redundant statements, so that static code anallyser will be assured, that Property can't have null at that specific line of code –  Ilya Ivanov Feb 19 '13 at 17:29
    
I am not sure which kind of invariants. Could you be so kind and update your code with that? –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 19 '13 at 17:31
    
Yes, that's the base of my problem: Property can be null. So I can't add all those invariants and ensures. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 19 '13 at 17:36
    
BTW: +1 for providing a reproduction with less code. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 19 '13 at 17:36
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

If the problem only manifests itself for code inside the class - as is the case in my example - the pragmatic solution is simple:

Use the backing field instead of the property:

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    private string _field;

    public string Property
    {
        get { return _field; }
    }

    private void SetField()
    {
        _field = " foo ";
    }

    private string Method()
    {
        SetField();
        return _field.Trim();
    }
}
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