Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to use a full-height app using flexbox. I found what I want using old flexbox (display: box; and other things) in this link: CSS3 Flexbox full-height app and overflow

This is a correct solution for the old version of the flexbox css properties.

If I want to try using the newer flexbox properties I'll try to use the second solution in the same link but "hacking" flexbox using a container with height: 0px; It makes to show a vertical scroll.

I don't like it a lot because It introduces other problems and it is more a workarround than a solution.

I have prepared a jsfiddle with a base example: http://jsfiddle.net/ch7n6/

#container {
    display: -webkit-flex;
    -webkit-flex-direction: column;
    height: 100%;
}
#container article {
    -webkit-flex: 1 1 auto;
    overflow-y: scroll;
}

It is a "full-height html web" and the footer are at the bottom because of the flexbox of the content element. I suggest you move the bar between css code and result to simulate different height.

Thanks for your answer.

share|improve this question
    
This isn't the behavior you're looking for? jsfiddle.net/ch7n6/2 –  cimmanon Feb 19 '13 at 17:59
    
jsfiddle.net/ch7n6/3 Yes! It is. :D But I can't understand why I need to indicate a height to obtain the effect. Anyway setting: height: 1px; works –  José Cabo Feb 19 '13 at 18:24
    
Now I changed the height to a min-height. Much better. Thanks you. –  José Cabo Feb 19 '13 at 18:27
    
@JoséCabo +1 - nice trick height:0 to show vertical scroll! Could you explain why this works? –  Danield Jun 24 '13 at 23:22
    
My answer to my question (the second answer for this question) I do my best to explain it. In reality what you want to do is use min-height instead of height for a "semantic" answer... but in reality is what the standard said. –  José Cabo Jun 25 '13 at 17:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Thanks to http://stackoverflow.com/users/1652962/cimmanon that gives me the answer.

The solution is putting to the vertical scrollable element a height. For example:

#container article {
    -webkit-flex: 1 1 auto;
    overflow-y: auto;
    height: 0px;
}

The element will have height because flexbox recalculates it unless you want a min-height so you can use height: 100px that it is exactly the same as: min-height: 100px;

#container article {
    -webkit-flex: 1 1 auto;
    overflow-y: auto;
    height: 100px; /* == min-height: 100px*/
}

So the best solution if you want a min-height in the vertical scroll:

#container article {
    -webkit-flex: 1 1 auto;
    overflow-y: auto;
    min-height: 100px;
}

If you just want full vertical scroll in case there is no enough space to see the article:

#container article {
    -webkit-flex: 1 1 auto;
    overflow-y: auto;
    min-height: 0px;
}

The final code: http://jsfiddle.net/ch7n6/4/

Thanks you again.

share|improve this answer
    
This example does not work in Firefox as of v36. Works perfectly in Chrome though. –  Matt Hughes Mar 19 at 3:59
    
@MattHughes, at that time, Firefox had no support for flexbox new API. At the moment, I think it does. Remove the vendor prefix and it should work for both (or at least for firefox). Use "flex" instead of "-webkit-flex" –  José Cabo Mar 20 at 15:26

The current spec says this regarding flex: 1 1 auto:

Sizes the item based on the width/height properties, but makes them fully flexible, so that they absorb any free space along the main axis. If all items are either flex: auto, flex: initial, or flex: none, any positive free space after the items have been sized will be distributed evenly to the items with flex: auto.

http://www.w3.org/TR/2012/CR-css3-flexbox-20120918/#flex-common

It sounds to me like if you say an element is 100px tall, it is treated more like a "suggested" size, not an absolute. Because it is allowed to shrink and grow, it takes up as much space as its allowed to. That's why adding this line to your "main" element works: height: 0 (or any other smallish number).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer but I can't vote up you right now :P It resolves everything of my doubt. –  José Cabo Feb 19 '13 at 18:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.