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I'm trying to convert an object which I have in a byte[] to an object. I've tried using this code I found online:

object byteArrayToObject(byte[] bytes)
    {
        try
        {
            MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(bytes);
            BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter();
            //ms.Position = 0;
            return bf.Deserialize(ms,null);
        }
        catch
        {
            return null;
        }
    }

SerializationException: "End of Stream encountered before parsing was completed.".

I've tried it with the ms.Position = 0 line uncommented of course too... bytes[] is only 8 bytes long, each byte isn't null.

Suggestions?

[edit]

The byte[] was written to a binary file from a c++ program using something along the lines of

void WriteToFile (std::ostream& file,T* value)
{
    file.write(reinterpret_cast<char*>(value), sizeof(*T))
}

Where value may be a number of different types. I can cast to some objects okay from the file using BitConverter, but anything BitConverter doesn't cover I can't do..

share|improve this question
2  
What data is contained in this array? What format is it in? –  cdhowie Feb 19 '13 at 16:41
    
Why can't you just cast it, as in (object)bytes? Are you trying to accomplish something else? –  Robert Harvey Feb 19 '13 at 16:42
4  
Are you sure the data was serialized correctly in the first place? –  MadSkunk Feb 19 '13 at 16:42
    
@RobertHarvey Well, the cast isn't necessary since there is an implicit conversion from all reference types to object... but I suspect that the OP wants to actually extract some information from the array, not change the type of reference used. –  cdhowie Feb 19 '13 at 16:42
2  
@judgeja You will have to manually deserialize the encoded data. A C++ struct does not have the same format as a serialized .NET object. In order for us to help you, you are going to have to include the C++ code used to encode the data. –  cdhowie Feb 19 '13 at 16:53

1 Answer 1

As was stated by cdhowie, you will need to manually deserialize the encoded data. Based on the limited information available, you may either want an array of objects or an object containing an array. It looks like you have a single long but there is no way to know from your code. You will need to recreate your object in its true form so take the below myLong as a simple example for a single long array. Since it was unspecified I'll assume you want a struct containing an array like:

public struct myLong {
    public long[] value;
}

You could do the same thing with an array of structs, or classes with minor changes to the code posted below.

Your method will be something like this: (written in the editor)

private myLong byteArrayToObject(byte[] bytes) {
    try
    {
        int len = sizeof(long);
        myLong data = new myLong();
        data.value = new long[bytes.Length / len];
        int byteindex = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < data.value.Length; i++) {
           data.value[i] = BitConverter.ToInt64(bytes,byteindex);
           byteindex += len;
        }            
        return data;
    }
    catch
    {
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Maybe I'm not being clear sorry. I have an object of whatever type T that was written to a binary file from a c++ program, which as shown above did reinterpret_cast<char*> on the object as it wrote it. I need to retrieve this object from the file. I know what type to look for and some of them I have gotten around with BitConverter as I said above and as you did here. But I can't do some other ones, such as DateTime with this method so I was hoping there is a way to convert it to an object and then I can get anything from there.... –  judgeja Feb 20 '13 at 0:31
1  
I had this same problem when I moved from VB6 to C#. In VB6 you can slam an array of user defined types to a binary file, and then read them back and the language converts the bytes to the type. Not so with C# AFAIK. DateTime.Ticks is a long and can be converted with BitConverter.ToInt64. –  Patrick White Feb 20 '13 at 2:22

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