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I am trying to return a C string from a function but its not working. Here is my code.

char myFunction()
{
    return "My String";
}

In main I am calling it like this:

int main()
{
  printf("%s",myFunction());
}

I have also tried some other ways for myFunction but they are not working. E.g:

char myFunction()
{
  char array[] = "my string";
  return array;
}

Note: I am not allowed to use pointers!

Little background on this problem: There is function which is finding out which month it is e.g; if its 1 then it return January etc etc.

So when its going to print, it's doing like this. printf("Month: %s",calculateMonth(month));. Now the problem is how to return that string from the calculateMonth function.

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4  
Unfortunately you need pointers in this case. –  Nick Bedford Sep 30 '09 at 6:01
1  
Why can't you use pointers? –  Nick Bedford Sep 30 '09 at 6:04
1  
@Hayato Well i believe we are are adults here and know it should return 0, it was just for sake of giving example lox.. –  itsaboutcode Sep 30 '09 at 6:08
2  
return 0 is implied by default only in C99 (and C++) but not in C90. –  hrnt Sep 30 '09 at 6:08
1  
Then you aren't going to be able to do it, beside dumb hacks which a really just broken down pointer manipulations anyway. Pointers exist for a reason... :| –  GManNickG Sep 30 '09 at 6:29

12 Answers 12

up vote 42 down vote accepted

your function signature needs to be:

const char * myFunction()
{
    return "My String";
}

Edit:

Background:

It's been years since this post & never thought it would it would be voted up, because it's so fundamental to C & C++. Nevertheless, a little more discussion should be in order.

In C (& C++ for that matter), a string is just an array of bytes terminated with a zero byte-- hence the term "string-zero" is used to represent this particular flavour of string. There are other kinds of strings, but in C (& C++), this flavour is inherently understood by the language itself. Other languages (Java, Pascal, etc) use different methodologies to understand "my string".

If you ever use the Windows API (which is in C++), you'll see quite regularly function parameters like: "LPCSTR lpszName". The 'sz' part represents this notion of 'string-zero': an array of bytes with a null (/zero) terminator.

Clarification:

For the sake of this 'intro', I use the word 'bytes' and 'characters' interchangeably, because it's easier to learn this way. Be aware that there are other methods (wide-characters, and multi-byte character systems--mbcs) that are used to cope with international characters. UTF-8 is an example of a mbcs. For the sake of intro, I quietly 'skip over' all of this.

Memory:

What this means is that a string like "my string" actually uses 9+1 (=10!) bytes. This is important to know when you finally get around to allocating strings dynamically. So, without this 'terminating zero', you don't have a string. You have an array of characters (also called a buffer) hanging around in memory.

Longevity of data:

In the above example, the actual data isn't available for long -- the optimising compiler will see that the data will be pushed onto a stack and then popped after the printf() call. So, any attempt to use the function this way:

const char * myFunction()
{
    return "My String";
}
int main() 
{
    const char* szSomeString = myFunction(); // fraught with problems
    printf("%s", szSomeString);
}

... will generally land you with random unhandled-exceptions/segment faults and the like. That is, your program will crash because the compiler (may/may not) have released the memory used by myFunction() by the time printf() is called. (Your compiler should also warn you of such problems beforehand).

In short, although my answer is correct -- 9 times out of 10 you'll end up with a program that crashes if you use it that way, especially if you think it's 'good practice' to do it that way. In short: It's generally not.

There are two ways to return strings that won't barf so readily.

  1. returning buffers (static or dynamically allocated) that live for a while, or
  2. pass a buffer to the function that gets filled in with information.

Note that it is impossible to use strings without using pointers in C. As I have shown, they are synonymous. Even in C++ with template classes, there are always buffers (ie pointers) being used in the background.

So, to better answer the (now modified question). (there are sure to be a variety of 'other answers' that can be provided).

eg 1. (using statically allocated strings):

const char* calculateMonth(int month) 
{
    static char* months[] = {"Jan", "Feb", "Mar" .... }; 
    static char badFood[] = "Unknown";
    if (month<1 || month>12) 
        return badFood; // choose whatever is appropriate for bad input. Crashing is never appropriate however.
    else
        return months[month-1];
}
int main()
{
    printf("%s", calculateMonth(2)); // prints "Feb"
}

What the 'static' does here (many programmers do not like this type of 'allocation') is that the strings get put into the data segment of the program. That is, it's permanently allocated.

If you move over to C++ you'll use similar strategies:

class Foo 
{
    char _someData[12];
public:
    const char* someFunction() const
    { // the final 'const' is to let the compiler know that nothing is changed in the class when this function is called.
        return _someData;
    }   
}

eg 2. using caller-defined buffers:

This is the more 'fool proof' way of passing strings around. The data returned isn't subject to manipulation by the calling party. That is, eg 1 can easily be abused by a calling party and expose you to application faults. This way, it's much safer (albeit uses more lines of code):

void calculateMonth(int month, char* pszMonth, int buffersize) 
{
    const char* months[] = {"Jan", "Feb", "Mar" .... }; // allocated dynamically during the function call. (Can be inefficient with a bad compiler)
    if (!pszMonth || buffersize<1) 
        return; // bad input. Let junk deal with junk data.
    if (month<1 || month>12)
    {
        *pszMonth = '\0'; // return an 'empty' string 
        // OR: strncpy(pszMonth, "Bad Month", buffersize-1);
    }
    else
    {
        strncpy(pszMonth, months[month], buffersize-1);
    }
    pszMonth[buffersize-1] = '\0'; // ensure a valid terminating zero! Many people forget this!
}

int main()
{
    char month[16]; // 16 bytes allocated here on the stack.
    calculateMonths(3, month, sizeof(month));
    printf("%s", month); // prints "Mar"
}

There are lots of reasons why the 2nd method is better, particularly if you're writing a library to be used by others (you don't need to lock into a particular allocation/deallocation scheme, 3rd parties can't break your code, you don't need to link to a specific memory management library), but like all code, it's up to you on what you like best. For that reason, most people opt for eg 1 until they've been burnt so many times that they refuse to write it that way anymore ;)

disclaimer:

I retired several years back and my C is a bit rusty now. This demo code should all compile properly with C (it is ok for any C++ compiler though).

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, the function needs to return a char *, as string literals in C are of type char[]. They, however, must not be modified in any way, so returning const char* is preferred (see securecoding.cert.org/confluence/x/mwAV). Returning char * may be needed if the string will be used in a legacy or external library function which (unfortunately) expects a char* as argument, even tough it will only read from it. C++, on the other hand, has string literals of const char[] type (and, since C++11, you can also have std::string literals). –  TManhente Mar 30 '14 at 12:33
    
A point of opinion: I've always detested 'My' in any form of code. It shows lack of thinking about who owns the code and doesn't add any information about what the code does. I've always grilled newbies straight from uni who have this deplorable habit. even 'Some' is oodles better than 'My' –  cmroanirgo Jun 18 '14 at 9:46
8  
@cmroanirgo the my prefix declares to the reader that the function was created by the user. I find it perfectly reasonable to use in such a context. –  quant Jul 30 '14 at 0:10

A C string is defined as a pointer to an array of characters.

If you cannot have pointers, by definition you cannot have strings.

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Your problem is with the return type of the function - it must be:

char *myFunction()

...and then your original formulation will work.

Note that you cannot have C strings without pointers being involved, somewhere along the line.

Also: Turn up your compiler warnings, it should have warned you about that return line converting a char * to char without an explicit cast.

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1  
I think the signature should const char* since the string is a literal but if I'm not mistaken the compiler will accept this. –  Luke Sep 30 '09 at 6:30

Based on your newly-added backstory with the question, why not just return an integer from 1 to 12 for the month, and let the main() function use a switch statement or if-else ladder to decide what to print? It's certainly not the best way to go - char* would be - but in the context of a class like this I imagine it's probably the most elegant.

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You are right, i am also thinking in these terms. –  itsaboutcode Sep 30 '09 at 6:28

Note this new function:

const char* myFunction()
{
        static char array[] = "my string";
        return array;
}

I defined "array" as static, otherwise when the function end, the variable (and the pointer you are returning) gets out of scope. Since that memory is allocated on the stack, it will get corrupted. The downside of this implementation is that the code is not re-entrant and not thread-safe.

Another alternative would be to use malloc to allocate the string in the heap, and then free on the correct locations of your code. This code will be re-entract and thread safe.

EDIT:

As noted in the comment, this is a very bad practice, since an attacker can then inject code to your app (he needs to open the code using gdb, then make a breakpoint and modify the value of a returned variable to overflow and fun just gets started).

If is much more recommended to let the caller handle about memory allocations. See this new example:

char* myFunction( char* output_str, size_t max_len )
{
   const char *str = "my string";
   size_t l = strlen(str);
   if (l+1 > max_len) {
      return NULL;
   }
   strcpy(str, str, l);
   return input;
}

Note that the only content which can be modified is the one that the user. Another side effect - this code is now thread safe, at least from the library point of view. The programmer calling this method should verify that the memory section used is thread safe.

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1  
This is generally a bad way to go about things. The char* is able to be manipulated by the surrounding code. That is, you can do things like this: strcpy(myFunction(), "A really long string"); and your program will crash due to access violation. –  cmroanirgo Jun 18 '14 at 9:44

Or how about this one:

void print_month(int month)
{
    switch (month)
    {
        case 0:
            printf("january");
            break;
        case 1:
            printf("february");
            break;
        ...etc...
    }
}

And call that with the month you compute somewhere else.

Regards,

Sebastiaan

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1  
+1 not what OP asked but this is probably what the assignment expect you to do, since he can't use pointers. –  Vitim.us Apr 13 '13 at 22:54

Your function return type is a single char. You should return a pointer to the first element of the character array. If you can't use pointers, then you are screwed. :(

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I am not allowed to use pointers :@ that's the problem. –  itsaboutcode Sep 30 '09 at 6:02

A char is only a single one-byte character. It can't store the string of characters, nor is it a pointer (which you apparently cannot have). Therefore you cannot solve your problem without using pointers (which char[] is syntactic sugar for).

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If you really can't use pointers, do something like this:

char get_string_char(int index)
{
    static char array[] = "my string";
    return array[index];
}

int main()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 9; ++i)
        printf("%c", get_string_char(i));
    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}

The magic number 9 is awful, this is not an example of good programming. But you get the point. Note that pointers and arrays are the same thing (kinda) so this is a bit cheating.

Hope this helps!

Regards,

Sebastiaan

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1  
It's using a pointer in sheep's clothing! :P –  Twisol Sep 30 '09 at 6:30
1  
I count exactly three pointer subexpressions in that code. –  caf Sep 30 '09 at 6:38
    
Usually if you need to implement such solutions to homework problems, then your preliminary assumptions are wrong. –  hrnt Sep 30 '09 at 11:11

Your function prototype states your function will return a char. Thus, you can't return a string in your function.

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Well in your code you are trying to return a String (In C which is nothing but null terminated array of chars) but return type of your function is char which is causing all the trouble for you. Instead you should write it this way:

const char* myFunction()
{

    return "My String";

}

And it's always good to qualify your type with const while assigning literals in C to pointers as literals in C aren't modifiable.

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You can create the array in the caller, which is the main function, and pass the array to the callee which is your myFunction(). Thus myFunction can fill the string into the array. However you need to declare myFunction() as

char* myFunction(char * buf, int buf_len){
  strncpy(buf, "my string", buf_len);
  return buf;
}

and in main function, myFunction should be called in this way

char array[51];
memset(array,0,51);/*all bytes are set to '\0'*/
printf("%s", myFunction(array,50));/*buf_len arguement is 50 not 51. This is to make sure the string in buf is always null-terminated(array[50] is always '\0')*/

However pointer is still used.

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Don't see any way to do this without using pointers. –  ouflak Apr 2 '14 at 10:40

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