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I am a little confused about rounding to nearest in floating point arithmetic. Let a, b, and c be normalized double precision floating point numbers. Is it true that a+b=b+a where + is correctly rounded to nearest floating point addition? My initial guess is yes this is always true, but I don't completely understand rounding to nearest. Could someone give an example of when a+b != b+a using floating point addition with rounding to nearest?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Properly implemented IEEE-754 floating-point addition is commutative (a+b equals b+a) regardless of rounding mode.

The rounding mode affects how the exact mathematical result is rounded to fit into the destination format. Since the exact mathematical results of a+b and b+a are identical, they are rounded identically.

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I see. Is it also associative? For example, does (a+b)+c = a+(b+c)? – SKLAK Feb 19 '13 at 17:53
1  
@SKLAK: No. Easy counterexample: a = 1e16, b = -1e16, c = 1. – Mark Dickinson Feb 19 '13 at 18:08
    
Arithmetic is not associative because changing the order of operations changes where rounding errors occur. E.g., the computed (a+b)+c and a+(b+c) are mathematically f(f(a+b)+c) and f(a+f(b+c)), where f is the function that rounds an exact mathematical value to a value representable in floating-point. There is generally no reason that f(a+b) will have the same rounding error as f(b+c), so these may produce different results. – Eric Postpischil Feb 19 '13 at 18:51

As noted above, addition is commutative but not associative. The difference in rounding modes can be seen by running the following (MS Visual Studio) C++ code:

#include <iostream>
#include <float.h>

#pragma fenv_access(on)

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    float a = 1.75f, b = 1e-6f;

    cout.setf(ios::fixed,ios::floatfield);
    cout.precision(7);

    cout << "a = " << a << ", b = " << b << endl;

    _controlfp_s(NULL, _RC_DOWN,_MCW_RC);

    cout << "Result of a + b rounded down: " << a+b << endl;
    cout << "Result of a - b rounded down: " << a-b << endl;

    _controlfp_s(NULL, _RC_UP,_MCW_RC);
    cout << "Result of a + b rounded up: " << a+b << endl;
    cout << "Result of a - b rounded up: " << a-b << endl;

    _controlfp_s(NULL, _RC_NEAR,_MCW_RC);
    cout << "Result of a + b rounded to nearest: " << a+b << endl;
    cout << "Result of a - b rounded to nearest: " << a-b << endl;

    return 0;
}

Output:

a = 1.7500000, b = 0.0000010
Result of a + b rounded down: 1.7500010
Result of a - b rounded down: 1.7499989
Result of a + b rounded up: 1.7500011
Result of a - b rounded up: 1.7499990
Result of a + b rounded to nearest: 1.7500010
Result of a - b rounded to nearest: 1.7499990
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