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I'm trying to use GWT's JSNI to call a Java function through native code. The Java function has an enum in it, and I was curious to know if the enum will marshall in the way I want. I couldn't find anything useful on Google or SO, and the Google basic docs are not very specific. I'm sure I'll find out as I compile and run, but thought I might as well ask.

Given vastly simplified code like this:

package my.example.package;
public class Giant {
    public enum GiantWord { FEE, FIE, FO, FUM };
    public void sayGiantWord(GiantWord word) { /* ... */ }

    public native JavaScriptObject toJS() /*-{
        var Giant = function() {
            this.sayGiantWord = function(word) {
                this.@my.example.package::sayGiantWord(Lmy/example/package/Giant$GiantWord;)(word);
            };
        };
        return new Giant();
    }-*/;
}

EDIT - Based on comments, let me give an alternative version of the toJS function, and avoid confusion between this and this.

    public static native JavaScriptObject toJS(final Giant g) /*-{
        var Giant = function() {
            this.sayGiantWord = function(word) {
                g.@my.example.package::sayGiantWord(Lmy/example/package/Giant$GiantWord;)(word);
            };
        };
        return new Giant();
    }-*/;

will calling sayGiantWord("FEE") from within JavaScript (on the appropriately acquired var from toJS()) work correctly? In other words, will the JSNI marshaller properly convert a String to its matching Java enum?

I expect calling sayGiantWord(1) will be more prone to marshall correctly, since an int can be converted to an enum easily.

Other notes:

  • The GWT Eclipse plugin is what gave me the syntax for accessing the class member's enum. At least that far, GWT is working with me.
  • I don't want to pass a number, and if necessary I know I can handle the string with a conversion function in the Java class as follows; I'd just rather not do so.
public void sayGiantWordJS(String word) {
    // convert the string to an enum
    // call sayGiantWord
}

Thanks for any advice!

share|improve this question
    
what do you mean by this? in native methods this refers to the function owner in JavaScript, i.e. var Giant, and not the Java type Giant. –  Eliran Malka Feb 21 '13 at 9:25
    
Based on the link I provided, I believe that JSNI will give special treatment to the word "this" in calls back into the Java code. So my first "this" was meant to refer to the JavaScript usage, while the second was meant to go through the special JSNI treatment. Still, I had done the second "this" as part of my simplification, so I'll update the question to avoid the ambiguity. –  Scott Mermelstein Feb 21 '13 at 15:09
    
well, regarding your question, simply pass the enum's .name(). –  Eliran Malka Feb 21 '13 at 22:56
    
I tried that - for example, calling the JS Giant.sayGiantWord("FEE"), but by the time it gets into the Java version, it's not an enum. –  Scott Mermelstein Feb 21 '13 at 23:04

2 Answers 2

Java enums can't be handled by JSNI, but you can pass enum strings to the JSNI layer, as well as convert strings returned from JSNI methods back to enums.

You'd also be better off representing the Giant JavaScript object separately, and delegate to the JSNI layer from the Giant Java type. That way you can maintain separation of concerns and loosely couple the implementation and the abstraction:

public class GiantJso extends JavaScriptObject {

    protected GiantJso() {
    }

    public static final native GiantJso create(String wordA, String wordB,
            String wordC) /*-{
        return {
            vocabulary : [ wordA, wordB, wordC ],
            said : ''
        };
    }-*/;

    public final native void sayGiantWord(String word) /*-{
        if (this.vocabulary.indexOf(word) != -1) {
            console.log("i'm a giant, here me roar: ", word, "!");
            this.said = word;
        }
    }-*/;

    public final native JsArrayString vocabulary() /*-{
        return this.vocabulary || null;
    }-*/;

    public final native String said() /*-{
        return this.said;
    }-*/;
}

Then wrap that in the Java type:

public class Giant {

    private GiantJso jso;

    public Giant() {
        jso = GiantJso.create(GiantWord.FEE.name(),
                GiantWord.FEE.name(), GiantWord.FEE.name());
    }

    public void sayGiantWord(GiantWord word) {
        jso.sayGiantWord(word.name());
    }

    public GiantWord getSaidWord() {
        return GiantWord.valueOf(jso.said());
    }
}

vocabulary and said are just examples of additional properties that can be assigned to the JSO, you're free to implement any structure you wish, of course.

Further reading

Note: If what you're going for is representing Java classes as JavaScript constructs, check out GWT exporter.

share|improve this answer
    
That seems not to give me anything I didn't already have - Giant.valueOf("FEE") and Giant.FEE.toString() is just as good, without all the fuss of adding to the Enum. I'll have to look further into GWT exporter, though. I came in to this project, and I know the initial developers are aware of it. I'm not sure why they're not using it. –  Scott Mermelstein Feb 22 '13 at 18:28
    
well, @ScottMermelstein, the important bit is not #toString() or #valueOf() -- they're just there for completeness sake. i suggest the use of #toEnum() to obtain an enum type after a string is returned from a JSNI method. –  Eliran Malka Feb 22 '13 at 20:44
    
valueOf is a built-in Java function that converts a string to an Enum, which is why I was using that. While I appreciate the time you're putting into this, I don't see how your answer is different from what I gave. It seems to boil down to "Enums aren't supported going from JS to Java, so use an intermediate function that will convert it back." –  Scott Mermelstein Feb 22 '13 at 20:54
    
oh shoot. i stand corrected, probably redundant to have toEnum() when we have valueOf(). i didn't know that method. i still think you're better off with overlay types. updating my answer accordingly. –  Eliran Malka Feb 23 '13 at 2:58
    
Thanks. That's an interesting pattern, and while I've used overlays, I hadn't thought of them for this context. (The issue is that I was just trying to make a Java function that uses an Enum be easily accessible to the JS side. Your solution can do that, but that's a lot of complexity for simply passing an enum through a function.) –  Scott Mermelstein Feb 23 '13 at 19:15
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I wasn't able to get the Enum to work at all. It seems to not be supported.

When I passed a string or a number through the JavaScript object, JSNI made no attempt to convert the input to an enum. It does convert Enums to special objects that have an "ordinal" value, but it didn't treat the number as the ordinal and didn't try to find the valueOf the input String. I considered adding a constructor to the enum, but everything I've seen says that's for adding extra data fields to the enum.

My answer was the one I said I'd rather avoid. In the end, my code looked similar to this:

package my.example.package;
public class Giant {
    public enum GiantWord { FEE, FIE, FO, FUM };
    public void sayGiantWord(GiantWord word) { /* ... */ }
    public void sayGiantWordJS(String word) {
        sayGiantWord(GiantWord.valueOf(word));
    }

    public static native JavaScriptObject toJS(final Giant g) /*-{
        var Giant = function() {
            this.sayGiantWord = function(word) {
                g.@my.example.package::sayGiantWordJS(Ljava/lang/String;)(word);
            };
        };
        return new Giant();
    }-*/;
}

Note - if you pass an invalid value through sayGiantWordJS(), you will get odd behavior in that valueOf throws an exception, but doesn't do so at the point where you invoke it. In my test, I didn't see the exception until the next user interface action that I made.

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