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I'm trying to get my program to read input from a file but not skip over empty lines that fscanf typically does. The file and loop to scan file is:

 inFile = fopen("text.txt", "r");

 for(i = 0; fscanf(inFile, "%s", &input[i]) != EOF; i++){
     printf("%d %s\n", i, input[i]);
 }

which outputs:

0 one
1 two
2 three
3 four
4 five
5 six
6 seven
7 eight
8 nine
9 ten
10 eleven
11 twelve
12 thirteen
13 fourteen
14 fifteen
15 sixteen
16 seventeen
17 eighteen
18 nineteen
19 twenty
20 thirty
21 forty
22 fifty
23 sixty
24 seventy
25 eighty
26 ninety

which isn't what I want. I want the text being read to represent the position in the array it says. ie "ninety" is found at input[89].

and the file being read is:

one
two
three
four
five
six
seven
eight
nine
ten
eleven
twelve
thirteen
fourteen
fifteen
sixteen
seventeen
eighteen
nineteen
twenty









thirty









forty









fifty









sixty









seventy









eighty









ninety

Each of those words is supposed represent which line it's being read from. I'm adding the space between the 20+ lines, so I can use i to represent the line of the data being read in. In short, I'm making a number to text generator that would read

999.99

as

nine hundred ninety-nine and 99/100

tl;dr I don't want to hard code the position in the array that contains a word, so I'm trying to make the iterator do the work, and that needs the blank lines read to take up their position in the array.

Any way I can make fscanf do the job here? Or should I use something else?

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
So given your text file you'd want input[20] to be an empty string, because there's no text there? –  Mike Feb 19 '13 at 17:26
    
Yes, pretty much. I mean, I should have said (i + 1) when outputting the array to clear up any confusion, but yeah. –  nzondlo Feb 19 '13 at 17:29
1  
By blank spaces do you blank lines ? If so, fgets(). –  hmjd Feb 19 '13 at 17:33
    
Yep! editted. Sorry about that. –  nzondlo Feb 19 '13 at 17:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think you'd be better off using fgets(). If necessary, you can then use sscanf() on the resulting string to parse it.

EDIT - Something like this:

inFile = fopen("text.txt", "r");
size_t i = 0;

while (fgets(input[i], LINE_SIZE, inFile))
{
    printf("%d %s\n", i, input[i]);
    ++i;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I found documentation, but any small explanation on how fgets() would work in my case? Or even a comparison to fscanf(), For the sake of a reference for Stack Overflow. –  nzondlo Feb 19 '13 at 17:47
    
Yep. That's what I was looking for. I didn't realize fgets() was returning true or false. Thank you very much. –  nzondlo Feb 19 '13 at 17:59
    
@Joghobs: It doesn't return true or false per se. From the linked documentation: "gets() and fgets() return s on success, and NULL on error or when end of file occurs while no characters have been read." –  Fred Larson Feb 19 '13 at 18:40

You should look into fgets() as it reads everything, including the newlines. Remember the lines aren't blank, they are just new lines. Furthermore fgets() is a far safer choice than fscanf().

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I'm looking at documentation and trying to get this to work. Can you give me a comparison to fscanf() and/or tell me how to get fgets() to work in my example? –  nzondlo Feb 19 '13 at 17:55

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