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I have a daemon program which reads the content of a file, then compress it and write it into smaller .tar.gz files.

For some reason, Java keeps on allocating memory, even after I have freed (or I think I have) all used memory. What is wrong with my code/reasoning?

FileOutputStream fos    = null;
GZIPOutputStream gzipos = null;
OutputStreamWriter osw  = null;

BufferedWriter bw = null;
while (true) {
    if (f.length() != 0) {
        if (outputfile == null) {
            outputfile = outputfileroot + "_" + outputPart + ".tar.gz";

            fos = new FileOutputStream(outputfile);
            gzipos  = new GZIPOutputStream(fos);
            osw = new OutputStreamWriter(gzipos);
            bw  = new BufferedWriter(osw);
        }
        else if (new File(outputfile).length() > maxLengthOutputFile) {
            bw.flush();
            osw.flush();
            gzipos.flush();
            fos.flush();
            bw.close();
            osw.close();
            gzipos.close();
            fos.close();

            bw  = null;
            osw = null;
            gzipos  = null;
            fos = null;

            System.gc();

            System.out.println("Finished writing " + outputfileroot + "_" + outputPart + ".tar.gz");

            outputfile = outputfileroot + "_" + ++outputPart + ".tar.gz";
            fos     = new FileOutputStream(outputfile);
            gzipos  = new GZIPOutputStream(fos);
            osw     = new OutputStreamWriter(gzipos);
            bw      = new BufferedWriter(osw);
        }

        /**
         * Read the entire file
         */
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(f));
        String line;
        while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
            // will send the content to another thread, so I need to read it line by line
            bw.write(line + "\r\n");
        }
        br.close();
        br = null;
        bw.flush();

        /**
         * Empty it
         */
        FileWriter fw = new FileWriter(f);
        fw.write("");
        fw.flush();
        fw.close();
        fw = null;
    }

    Thread.sleep(1000);
}
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One thing I found is, you are never ending while loop ie while(true) –  Pradeep Simha Feb 19 '13 at 17:26
2  
by the way, java does not immediately remove memory if unused. It is up to the VM to free the memory –  cIph3r Feb 19 '13 at 17:26
3  
How do you know it keeps allocating memory? Do you run into an out-of-memory error? The System.gc() in your code is not required to actually do anything; the JVM can interpret it as a mere hint. –  tucuxi Feb 19 '13 at 17:27
1  
Use jvisualvm (or another profiler) to profile memory allocation and find where it allocates the memory that is not freed. –  Cyrille Ka Feb 19 '13 at 17:28
    
@cIph3r - presumably everything is wrapped in a method that throws Exception or something similar; the Thread.sleep() should avoid excessive CPU usage. –  tucuxi Feb 19 '13 at 17:28

3 Answers 3

Objects are not freed from memory just because they are no longer referenced. The JVM decides when to run its "garbage collection", which frees up memory. But it generally won't run garbage collection unless it needs to. For more information, you can see this page about the topic.

You can call System.gc() to explicitly invoke the garbage collector (point #7 in the link), but it doesn't have to run.

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You're overcooking this. All that null-setting and gc()-calling doesn't actually help, and you have several times as many flushes and closes as you really need. Also you have no need to be using Readers and Writers at all. All that can be reduced to this:

GZIPOutputStream gzipos = null;
while (true)
{
    if (f.length() != 0)
    {
        if (outputfile == null)
        {
            outputfile = outputfileroot + "_" + outputPart + ".tar.gz";
            gzipos = new GZIPOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(outputfile));
        }
        else
        {
            if (new File(outputfile).length() > maxLengthOutputFile)
            {
                gzipos.close();
                System.out.println("Finished writing " + outputfileroot + "_" + outputPart + ".tar.gz");
                outputfile = outputfileroot + "_" + ++outputPart + ".tar.gz";
                gzipos = new GZIPOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(outputfile));
            }
        }

        /**
         * Read the entire file
         */
        InputStream in = new FileInputStream(f);
        byte[] buffer = new byte[8192];
        int count;
        while ((count = in.read(buffer)) > 0)
        {
            gzipos.write(buffer, 0, count);
        }
        in.close();
        gzipos.flush();
        /**
         * Empty it
         */
        f.createNewFile();
    }
    Thread.sleep(1000);
}

I can't make any sense of your comment 'will send the content to another thread, so I need to read it line by line'. There are no threads in this code, and you don't need the input line by line.

I'm also curious as to how this interacts with whatever is producing the input file. I think you should rename the input file, and create a new empty one in its place, as soon as you decide to copy it, rather than after the copy step.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, your code actually helped a lot for a memory consumption point of view. Your last paragraph is also helpful, I ended editing the original Python code (the input) to directly write tgz files, so there's no problem with the simultaneous writing/reading. The Python also writes to another file basically "I'm done with file X" so Java knows it can be opened and processed. But thanks anyway –  user2088074 Feb 20 '13 at 11:08

System.gc() sends a request for garbage collection. The runtime decides whether to perform it or ignore said request.

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