Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an object that I would like to display in a Details view. The object has a bunch of properties that the view needs.

The object also has parents and grandparents, which I need to display in the view.

What I have for my object viewModel is:

public class ObjectViewModel
{
    // Used when creating a new object under a parent object
    [HiddenInput(DisplayValue = false)]
    public int? ParentObjectId { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public Object Object { get; set; }

    // Info that only the view needs, which is defined in the Controller based on some logic
    public string ActiveTitle { get; set; }

    // A bre
    public IList<Object> ParentObjects { get; set; } 
}

I then use this in my Detail controller method:

public ActionResult Detail(int objectId)
{

    // TODO: Make this a service call
    var object = _db.Objects.FirstOrDefault(s => s.ObjectId == objectId);

    if (object == null)
    {
        return View("Error");
    }

    var model = new SetViewModel() { 
         ActiveTitle = object.Name, 
         Object = object, 
         ParentObjectId = object.ParentObject.ObjectId, 
         ParentObjects = _objectService.GetParentObjects(set.ParentObject)
    };

    return View(model);
}

Does this look right? Or should I be pulling the required fields from the Object model into the viewModel, and not the objects themselves?

share|improve this question
    
Firstly, I don't think this is a good question for SO. Secondly, you pull as much data as you need. Using whole objects are fine, if you don't use all the properties then you decide if that's an acceptable performance hit or not. –  musefan Feb 19 '13 at 17:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To have an object type in your view model is super vague and your code would be hard to support if you are not the original programmer. I would Add the class type to the actual model or use generics to specify the class type as shown below:

public class ObjectViewModel<T>
{
    // Used when creating a new object under a parent object
    [HiddenInput(DisplayValue = false)]
    public int? ParentObjectId { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public T Object { get; set; }

    // Info that only the view needs, which is defined in the Controller based on some logic
    public string ActiveTitle { get; set; }

    // A bre
    public IList<T> ParentObjects { get; set; } 
}
share|improve this answer

Either option will work, and you will often have a mixture of both techniques in a given application.

The key idea is that your view model should contain what the view needs in order to display the data to the user.

If your view merely displays the individual, primitive fields in simply controls, e.g. a series of labels or textbox controls, then your view model should probably specify only the fields, and not the parent object.

However, it's very possible for your view to include a templated or custom control that "knows how" to display a complex object in its entirety. In that case, your view model would need to include the entire object. (In practice I find myself doing this much more often in WPF than ASP-MVC but I've done both).

share|improve this answer

It looks like the answer will be contextual. Many teams using layered architectures might adopt architectural conventions whereby layers below X should not be referenced directly by your views, and a data access class might be a likely candidate for such a restriction. In your case, it does look like you will be binding your view's structure to the structure directly to your database schema (assuming, since you're using "_db"), which might be considered unreasonably tight coupling.

Also, I'm assuming you're using "object" to represent "any general thing" rather than literally a System.Object, since your objects appear to have an ObjectId property in your lambda expression.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.