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In the following code with the printf() statement I get a segmentation fault: 11. Without it I do not get any of errors but I want to be able to see the correct values are in the newstring value. How do I go about doing this?

  char* newstring;
  for(int i = 0; i < len; i++)
  {
    printf("value %d\n", tempfullstring[i]);
    if (tempfullstring[i]>=97 && tempfullstring[i] <=122)
    {
      char value = tempfullstring[i];
      newstring += value;
    }
  }
  printf("The new string is %s", newstrng);
  return 0;
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Which printf() line that has the problem? What is the content of tempfullstring? Can you give us more useful code? –  Mido Feb 19 '13 at 18:02
    
In your printf statement, newstring is misspelled ("newstrng"). I'm not sure if this was a typing error local to your post, or if it mirrors your actual code. –  Tebc Feb 19 '13 at 18:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you have a misunderstanding of how C strings work:

  • They do not get initialized on declaration (so char* newstring; must be assigned separately, or you get undefined behavior)
  • They cannot be concatenated with a += operator (so newstring += value; is invalid)
  • The space for C strings needs to be managed explicitly (so you would either need to allocate your newstring in the automatic storage area, or add a free at the end).

The easiest way of fixing your program is to guess how long the newstring is going to be, and use strcat to append data to it:

char newstring[1000]; // some max length
newstring[0] = '\0';  // make it an empty string
...
strcat(newstring, value); // instead of newstring += value
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newstring += value is valid, it just does not do what the OP thinks it does. –  William Pursell Feb 19 '13 at 18:02
    
@WilliamPursell That's why I said that it does not concatenate, as opposed to calling it invalid :) –  dasblinkenlight Feb 19 '13 at 18:04
    
I understand thank you very much :) –  user1840255 Feb 19 '13 at 18:54
newstring += value

You are appending to a string in an illegal way, what you are actually doing is changing an uninitialized pointer, so you are moving an changing address to another invalid address instead.

You should, first of all, have some room in which you are going to store the new string such with

char newstring[64];

and then append a character by doing

newstring[j] = tempfullstring[i];

This won't append the NUL terminating character through, you will have to add it to the end manually or use a different approach (such as using strncat and append directly from the original string:

strncat(newstring+j, tempfullstring+i, 1);
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Yes, it has to, infact in the strncat approach I used i and j –  Jack Feb 19 '13 at 18:05
    
I think you edited as I was typing –  Collin Feb 19 '13 at 18:05

this is the code you'll want to make this work.

 char* newstring = malloc (sizeof(char)*len+1);   // this will be worst case (all are >=97 o <=122
    int j=0;
      for(int i = 0; i < len; i++)
      {
        printf("value %d\n", tempfullstring[i]);
        if (tempfullstring[i]>=97 && tempfullstring[i] <=122)
        {
          char value = tempfullstring[i];
          newstring[j]= value;
          j++;
        }
      }
      newstring[j]='\0';
      printf("The new string is %s", newstrng);
      return 0;
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