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First, a little background. I'm developing a REST API using ASP.NET Web API and Entity Framework 5 however the requirements of the system are such that several layers of logic sit between my ApiControllers and my DbContext. These layers of logic involve detaching my entities from the DbContext, applying sets of hypothetical changes to the entities in memory (a process I'm calling materialization of a change set) then allowing users to inspect the new state of the system should these changes get applied. The new state of the entities is not saved to the database immediately. Instead, the materialization is held in memory on the web server and users can inspect either the current data or one of the many materialization of a variety of change sets.

Now for my problem.

public interface IIdentifiable
{
    long Id { get; set; }
}

public class Foo : IIdentifiable
{
    public long Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public List<Bar> Bars { get; set; } // Navigation Property
}

public class Bar : IIdentifiable
{
    public long Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public long FooId { get; set; } // Foreign Key Property
    public Foo Foo { get; set; } // Navigation Property
}

public class Materialization
{
    IEnumerable<Foo> Foos { get; set; } 
    IEnumerable<Bar> Bars { get; set; } 
}

public interface IRepository<TItem> : IQueryable<TItem>, ICollection<TItem>, IDisposable
    where TItem : class, IIdentifiable
{
    IRepository<TItem> Include<TProperty>(Expression<Func<TItem, TProperty>> path);
    // Other methods
}

public class MateriailizationRepository<TItem> : IRepository<TItem>
    where TItem : class, IIdentifiable
{
    private Materialization _materialization;

    public MateriailizationRepository(Materialization materialization)
    {
        _materialization = materialization;
    }

    public IRepository<TItem> Include<TProperty>(Expression<Func<TItem, TProperty>> path)
    {
        // Populate navigation property indicated by "path"
    }

    // Other methods
}

Each Bar has a foreign key property indicating the Foo it belongs to but the Bar.Foo and Foo.Bars navigation properties are not populated as this would complicate with the materialization process. Hence, after materialization has completed, Materialization.Foos and Materialization.Bars contain collections of objects that refer to each other by foreign key properties but not by navigation properties (i.e. the values of all navigation properties are null or empty List<T>s). I want to be able to do something like the following in my ApiController.

public IQueryable<Foo> Get (bool includeBars = false)
{
    Materialization materialization;

    // Materialize

    using (IRepository<Foo> repository = new MateriailizationRepository<Foo>(materialization))
    {
        IRepository<Foo> query = repository;

        if (includeBars)
            query = query.Include(f => f.Bars);

        return query;
    }
}

MateriailizationRepository<Foo>'s primary responsibility is to fetch materialized Foo objects but since it has a reference to the entire Materialization I would like to be able to include materialized Bar objects from Materiailization.Bars on demand.

How would I go about implementing MateriailizationRepository.Include() to mimic the IQueryable.Include() extension method?

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Check this out. Seems like what you want to accomplish: stackoverflow.com/questions/19665887/… – Aidin Nov 9 '13 at 2:04
    
Is this a generic api or some sort of science domain? – Marius Feb 3 '14 at 7:21

Here are a couple of options:

  1. Look at using another context to implement your MaterializationRepositories and have it backed by an in memory database such as Effort, if that's still working nowadays.
  2. Re-implement the 'Include' functionality yourself on the Materialization. The Expression can be broken down to find the type of the navigation property. Using naming conventions you can work out what foreign key property you need to interrogate to get the correct identifier. To find the target repository you could use reflection over the Materialization looking for the public property of type IEnumerable of the type of the navigation property. As long as you knew the name of the primary key of the target entity (by convention, say) you could then use the foreign key value to find it.

If you have a small number of entity types you'd probably be better off having some kind of switch statement and do some of it manually rather than via reflection.

Apologies that this isn't a fully worked through implementation, but I hope it leads in the right direction.

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