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I'm trying to put together a script, that will start my (Node) development server, and whenever it receives a SIGHUP it should restart the server.

I've gotten as far as spawning the server, shutting it down and restarting the server on SIGHUP. But because I'm using wait in the spawning code, the SIGHUP handler never really returns, which leads to the signal never firing again.

Here's a stripped down version of my script:

SERVER_PID=""

start_server() {
    npm start &
    SERVER_PID=$!
    wait $SERVER_PID
}
terminate_server() {
    [ ! "xSERVER_PID" = "X" ] && kill -SIGTERM $SERVER_PID
    SERVER_PID=""
}
refresh_server() {
    terminate_server
    start_server
}

trap refresh_server SIGHUP
start_server

As I mentioned, it starts the server fine, and works as expected on the first SIGHUP, but since refresh_server never returns because of the wait in start_server, subsequent signals don't trigger any action.

For now, I've solved the issue by taking out the wait in start_server, and adding an infinite "while-true-sleep" loop at the bottom (after the initial call to start_server), but I'm sure there must be a better way to accomplish what I'm looking to achieve. Also, I dislike the delay in signal triggering incurred from the sleep loop approach.

share|improve this question
1  
Typically, you use init (or upstart or systemd or whatever your OS uses) for this kind of service monitoring. –  chepner Feb 19 '13 at 18:13
1  
@chepner Naturally. This is for a dev-server running on my localhost. The SIGHUP'ing would be done by a watch+build script, upon changes in relevant parts of the code. Doing this by hand is starting to piss me off. –  nikc.org Feb 19 '13 at 18:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
+200

How about a while-true-wait loop?

#!/bin/bash
SERVER_PID=""
SERVER_NAME="npm start"

start_server() {
    $SERVER_NAME &
    SERVER_PID=$!
    SERVER_ACTIVE=true
}
terminate_server() {
    [ ! "xSERVER_PID" = "X" ] && kill -SIGTERM $SERVER_PID
    SERVER_PID=""
}
refresh_server() {
    terminate_server
    start_server
}

trap refresh_server SIGHUP
start_server
while $SERVER_ACTIVE; do
  SERVER_ACTIVE=false
  wait $SERVER_PID
done

Some kind of waiting event loop is required, if it should be repeated, either explicitly in the script or somewhere hidden in bash

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice. I like this a lot. –  nikc.org Feb 21 '13 at 21:57
    
@F.Hauri: That really does not matter, SERVER_PID is not "", when terminate is called, or you have other problems... And even if it were, callnig kill without a parameter does not do any harm –  BeniBela Feb 23 '13 at 10:47
    
Well the $ is missing in my original snippet as well, and I wouldn't down vote for that anyway. –  nikc.org Feb 23 '13 at 23:11
    
You'r wrong: Trap have to not execute but only to flag, in order to prevent bounces. This work but is not well –  F. Hauri Feb 26 '13 at 6:43
    
what does [ ! "xSERVER_PID" = "X" ] ?? You seem miss some $ and maybe some tests... –  F. Hauri Feb 3 '14 at 13:20

Here's a solution with a tail-recursive start_server, with only minor changes to your code. (removed one line and added three lines containing HUPPED)

HUPPED=false
SERVER_PID=""

start_server() {
    npm start &
    SERVER_PID=$!
    wait $SERVER_PID
    if $HUPPED; then HUPPED=false; start_server; fi
}
terminate_server() {
    [ ! "xSERVER_PID" = "X" ] && kill -SIGTERM $SERVER_PID
    SERVER_PID=""
}
refresh_server() {
    HUPPED=true
    terminate_server
    #start_server
}

trap refresh_server SIGHUP
start_server
share|improve this answer
    
The typo was mine, no need to down vote for copying that. –  nikc.org Feb 23 '13 at 23:19

Signal trap under bash

Return from exception

Like using signaling in other programmation languages, signal trapping could be done easely in a wrong way;

When using trap you have to not process your function inside the trap evaluation, but only set a flag that main program could check after end of trap exception, in order to make exception execution shorter as possible.

Especially, you have to not initiate a fork to a sub process at trap execution level!

A correct example

#!/bin/bash

SERVER_PID=""
CMD_TRAP=""

npm() { #Doing something that could be checked from external
    if [ "$1" ] && [ "$1" == "start" ] ;then
    while :;do
        date "+%s%N" >/tmp/dummyfile.txt
        sleep .333
          done
    fi
}

start_server() {
    npm start &
    SERVER_PID=$!
}
terminate_server() {
    [ "$SERVER_PID" ] && ps $SERVER_PID &>/dev/null && kill -TERM $SERVER_PID
    SERVER_PID=""
}
refresh_server() {
    terminate_server
    start_server
}

printf "for:\n   server restart, hit: 'kill -USR2 %d'\n" $$
printf "   server stop, hit: 'kill %d' (or Ctrl+C)\n" $$

trap 'CMD_TRAP=refresh' USR2 HUP
trap 'CMD_TRAP=terminate' TERM INT

start_server
while [ "$SERVER_PID" ];do 
    wait $SERVER_PID
    case "$CMD_TRAP" in
        refresh   ) refresh_server   ;;
        terminate ) terminate_server ;;
        *         ) refresh_server   ;;        # in case server just end.
      esac;
    CMD_TRAP=""
    [ "$SERVER_PID" ] && echo "LOOP." || echo "EXIT."
  done

Features

This demo script do:

  • service will be started when script is started,
  • service will be restarted if a USR2 or a HUP signal is recieved,
  • service will be restarted if it just finish or recieve any signal and
  • service will be properly stopped is a TERM signal is recieved or
    • if Ctrl-C is hitted on console.
  • exceptions is handled correctly (return immediately to main routine)
  • no unwanted/unmanaged error messages

Outputs samples

window1

tty
/dev/pts/0

window2

ps --tty pts/0 fw
  PID TTY      STAT   TIME COMMAND
 2996 pts/0    Ss     0:01 bash
 5187 pts/0    S+     0:00  \_ bash

window1

./serverScript.sh 
for:
   server restart, hit: 'kill -USR2 11469'
   server stop, hit: 'kill 11469' (or Ctrl+C)

window2

ps --tty pts/0 fw
  PID TTY      STAT   TIME COMMAND
 2996 pts/0    Ss     0:01 bash
 5187 pts/0    S      0:00  \_ bash
11469 pts/0    S+     0:00      \_ /bin/bash ./servermon.sh
11470 pts/0    S+     0:00          \_ /bin/bash ./servermon.sh

cat /tmp/dummyfile.txt 
1361603642256133674

cat /tmp/dummyfile.txt 
1361603648712606114

    ps --tty pts/0 fw
  PID TTY      STAT   TIME COMMAND
 2996 pts/0    Ss     0:01 bash
 5187 pts/0    S      0:00  \_ bash
11469 pts/0    S+     0:00      \_ /bin/bash ./servermon.sh
11470 pts/0    S+     0:01          \_ /bin/bash ./servermon.sh
16814 pts/0    S+     0:00              \_ sleep .333

kill -USR2 11469

window1

LOOP.

window2

    ps --tty pts/0 fw
  PID TTY      STAT   TIME COMMAND
 2996 pts/0    Ss     0:01 bash
 5187 pts/0    S      0:00  \_ bash
11469 pts/0    S+     0:00      \_ /bin/bash ./servermon.sh
17152 pts/0    S+     0:00          \_ /bin/bash ./servermon.sh
17532 pts/0    S+     0:00              \_ sleep .333

cat /tmp/dummyfile.txt
1361604208069564188
cat /tmp/dummyfile.txt
1361604209103660589

kill -USR2 11469

window1

LOOP.

window2

cat /tmp/dummyfile.txt
1361604278583723517

cat /tmp/dummyfile.txt
1361604279605292149

kill 11469

window1

EXIT.
$

Window 1 terminate loop and server sub process.

window1

./serverScript.sh 
for:
   server restart, hit: 'kill -USR2 19232'
   server stop, hit: 'kill 19232' (or Ctrl+C)

Then if Ctrl+C is pressed:

window1

^CEXIT.
$

window2

ps --tty pts/0 fw
  PID TTY      STAT   TIME COMMAND
 2996 pts/0    Ss     0:01 bash
 5187 pts/0    S+     0:00  \_ bash

Explanation

Exception could not be stacked. So while an exception is executed another interrupt could be ignored:

This could become important if for sample, your refresh_server() function have to compress and rotate some logs before restarting server:

refresh_server() {
    terminate_server
    lockedfilename=-$(date +%F_%H-%M-%S-$$)
    mv /srv/logfile /srv/logfile-$lockedfilename
    gzip /srv/logfile-$lockedfilename
    start_server
}

Many interrupts could be sumarized or ignored at main loop, but processing have to be done at main level only.

There is a little demo about what's wrong:

window1

trap "echo USR2 sleep 4;sleep 4" USR2
while :;do printf "\r%s " $(date +%s%N);sleep .333;done
1361606565xxxxxxxxx

( xxxxxxxxx changing 3x / second)

window2

for ((i=5;i--;));do echo KILL;kill -USR2 5187;sleep .5;done
KILL
KILL
KILL
KILL
KILL

1361606722582175969 USR2 sleep 4
USR2 sleep 4
1361606770xxxxxxxxx

Only two interrupts over five was trapped across my loop.

If you search an explanation: 5 x 0,5 = 2,5 seconds. It is far less than 4 seconds sleep, so why did I recieve a second interrupt, but not all five??

Untrap at main loop

There is a little trick for untrapping at main loop:

while [ "$SERVER_PID" ];do 
    wait $SERVER_PID

    OLDIFS="$IFS" IFS=$'\n'
    TRAPS=($(trap))                            # save traps
    IFS="$OLDIFS"
    eval "$(printf "trap -- %s\n" ${TRAPS[@]##*\'})"  # untrap

    case "$CMD_TRAP" in
        refresh   ) refresh_server   ;;
        terminate ) terminate_server ;;
        *         ) refresh_server   ;;        # in case server just end.
      esac;
    CMD_TRAP=""
    if [ "$SERVER_PID" ]
    then echo "LOOP."
    else echo "EXIT."

        eval "$(printf "%s\n" "${TRAPS[@]}")"      # restore traps
    fi
  done
share|improve this answer
    
@nikc.org Did you try this? –  F. Hauri Mar 16 '13 at 7:05
    
yes, I did. I adopted the flagging method in your first example. –  nikc.org Feb 2 '14 at 10:49
    
Hem... also please upvote!? –  F. Hauri Feb 3 '14 at 13:22
    
I did. Already way back when. –  nikc.org Feb 4 '14 at 8:25

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