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I have a VC named Dashboard (D) which can open a VC named Login (L) and a VC named Register (R). Login can open VC Register too.

I try to use storyboard as often as possible, so I have created with it three Segues, D to L, D to R, L to R

So, in case of D -> L -> R and in case of D -> R, when I close R, I have to close L if it necessary and inform D which he can begin to load the user infos (launch function in nutshell).

So, I would like get the sender of Segue in destination vc, knowing that I put it in sender entrie of performSegueWithIdentifier like that :

[self performSegueWithIdentifier:@"SegueToFbRegister" sender:self];
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'd do this by having R send a notification when the registration/login is done, and having D listen to it then pop everything and load your data.

If however you insist on getting a reference to the sender, you can add this property on your destination VC and set it in the source VC's prepareForSegue:sender:

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Thanks a lot for your quick response, I wasn't aware of notification. I try your way which seems more proper. But you know the best way to close R and L, knowing that L is probably not created. –  Thomas Leduc Feb 19 '13 at 18:41
3  
Are you using a UINavigationController ? If so, popToRootViewController: will remove all VCs that have been pushed. If you're presenting modal VCs instead, calling dismissViewControllerAnimated:completion: on the first controller that has been presented will also dismiss all the others that have been presented on top of it. –  Taum Feb 19 '13 at 18:45
    
You're perfect ! Efficient and perfect ! –  Thomas Leduc Feb 19 '13 at 18:50
    
Avec plaisir ;) –  Taum Feb 19 '13 at 20:22

This sounds like a great place to use Delegates. In your RegisterViewController.h define a protocol like this

@protocol RegisterViewDelegate <NSObject>
- (void)tellRegisterDelegateSomething:(NSObject*)something;
@end

Then on your class keep a pointer to your delegate

@interface RegisterViewController : UIViewController
@property (weak, nonatomic) id <RegisterViewDelegate> delegate;
@end

Now tell the presenting view controllers that they implement the new protocol you just created. This is done in the .h files of the other viewcontrollers that present this view.

In LoginViewController.h

@interface LoginViewController : UIViewController <RegisterViewDelegate>
@end

In DashboardViewController.h

@interface DashboardViewController : UIViewController <RegisterViewDelegate>
@end

In the .m files of the above classes, implement the protocol's method

- (void)tellRegisterDelegateSomething:(NSObject*)something
{
}

Now you need to assign the delegate when you perform your segue from either presenting view controller like this.

- (void)prepareForSegue:(UIStoryboardSegue *)segue sender:(id)sender
{
    if ([[segue identifier] isEqualToString:@"SegueToFbRegister"])
    {
        RegisterViewController* destination = [segue destinationViewController];
        destination.delegate = self;
    }
}

Now you can call the presenting view controller (delegate) and have it do something with any information you need to send back like this (this would be called in your RegisterViewController.m).

if ([self.delegate respondsToSelector:@selector(tellRegisterDelegateSomething:)])
{
    // Tell the delegate something.
    [self.delegate tellRegisterDelegateSomething:something];
}

The instance where you need to pass back through two controller you follow the same basic pattern.

@protocol LoginViewDelegate <NSObject>
- (void)tellLoginDelegateSomething:(NSObject*)something;
@end

Then on your class keep a pointer to your delegate

@interface LoginViewController : UIViewController
@property (weak, nonatomic) id <LoginViewDelegate> delegate;
@end

Now tell the Dashboard view controller that it implements the protocol. This is done in the .h files of the Dashboard viewcontrollers that present this view.

In DashboardViewController.h

@interface DashboardViewController : UIViewController <RegisterViewDelegate, LoginViewDelegate>
@end

In the .m files of the DashboardViewController implement the protocol's method

Follow the above pattern of setting the delegate on the viewcontroller when you perform the segue. Now when the delegate method is called in the LoginViewController, you call the delegate in the DashboardViewController as well.

in LoginViewController.m

- (void)tellRegisterDelegateSomething:(NSObject*)something
{
    if ([self.delegate respondsToSelector:@selector(tellLoginDelegateSomething:)])
    {
        // Tell the delegate something.
        [self.delegate tellLoginDelegateSomething:something];
    }
}

Now you are all connected so you can pass data back through both controllers (or just one) and do something with it. You will know which scenario you are in because different delegate methods will be called in the DashboardViewController based on which viewcontroller was visible.

Hope this helps.

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Thanks you too, but the Taum's solution is more simple for a newbie on ios. –  Thomas Leduc Feb 20 '13 at 12:59
    
That's no problem. His is perfectly valid as well. Using the delegate approach is just a little more flexible because you can call back to your delegate with information from the current view. It is also more useful in scenarios where you have modal or pop-over views because you can send the info back to the delegate and you don't always have the option of just popping those types of views from the navigation controller. Definitely a powerful tool to learn (and not very complicated) even for a newbie. Good luck –  johnrechd Feb 20 '13 at 16:43

Create a delegate for R and make D and L to implement the delegate methods.Use prepareForSegue:sender to assign the delegate of R.When you finish task in R use your delegate to perform the rquired action.

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