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class Interface
{
};

class Class : public Interface
{
};

class Foo
{
public:
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Interface>>& GetInterfaces()
    {
        return *(std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Interface>>*)(&m_data);
        //return m_data;
    }

private:
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Class>> m_data;
};

This works but is ugly and scary. Is there a better/safer way to do it? I don't want to make m_data of type std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Interface>> because the module Foo belongs to works entirely with Class's, Interface (and Foo::GetInterfaces()) are implemented to interact with a separate module that should only know about the Interface functionality.

Let me know if anything here is unclear, it makes sense to me but I've been banging my head against the problem for a while.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Casting is not correct, they are distinct types; I am pretty certain you are invoking undefined behaviour.

You need to construct a new vector and return it by value.

std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Interface>> b (m_data.begin(), m_data.end());
return b;

This should still be fairly cheap (1 allocation).

share|improve this answer
    
What's the shared pointer going to do in that situation? I'm not sure it's going to want to share pointers between two different types of shared pointer! – Michael Kohne Feb 19 '13 at 18:46
    
@MichaelKohne no this is fine. – 111111 Feb 19 '13 at 18:47
    
Ahh, move semantics for the win! should make returning by value ok. – Marcos Marin Feb 19 '13 at 18:48
    
@111111 - what makes that OK? You can't assign shared pointers of different types (even if they are base and child classes) with any compiler I have handy, so I don't understand how this can work. I don't have the latest compilers, so it may just be something I don't know. – Michael Kohne Feb 19 '13 at 19:04
    
@MichaelKohne then get a better compiler ideone.com/GjBwHd – 111111 Feb 19 '13 at 19:10

Besides that this is not possible with the implementation of vector, the issue is also that references don't convert. Your code is even worse and is undefined behavior.

What you can do is provide an interface that exposes a range or begin/end instead of the container itself. If you combine that with a transform_iterator that does the conversion, you should be set.

Sample code:

class Interface {
  virtual ~Interface();
};

class X : public Interface {};

class C {

private:
  typedef std::shared_ptr<Interface> iptr_type;
  typedef std::shared_ptr<Class> ptr_type;
  std::vector<ptr_type> v_;

  struct F {
    iptr_type 
    operator()(ptr_type p) { return iptr_type(p); }
  };

  typedef boost::transform_iterator<
    F, std::vector<ptr_type>::iterator> iiterator;

public:
  iiterator
  begin()
  { 
    return boost::make_transform_iterator(
      begin(v_), F()); 
  }

  iiterator
  end()
  { 
    return boost::make_transform_iterator(
      end(v_), F());
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
If it makes sense in your use case then exposing a .begin() and .end() iterator interface is a good option. – 111111 Feb 19 '13 at 18:45
    
@111111 Sure, that as well. But I guess ranges are the more hip thing. – pmr Feb 19 '13 at 18:46
    
my comment was one in support of your idea :) – 111111 Feb 19 '13 at 18:46

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