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I'm creating a simple AI that needs to evaluate board states according to a defined policy rule. The game is quite like Tetris: you need to decide the best current move, given the board state and the sequence of the N next pieces (N is a variable).

In other words, you must use the first piece on the piece-queue (like Tetris with multiple 'next' levels).

For one-move ahead, this is very simple:

bestMove = function(Board board, piece piece)
{
     possibleMoves = getPossibleMoves(board, piece)
     bestMove = null
     bestScore = -INFINITY
     boardCp = clone(board)     

     for (move in possibleMoves)
     {
         tempBoard = applyMove(boardCp, move)
         if (tempBoard.score > bestScore)
         {
             bestMove = move
             bestScore = tempBoard.score
         }
         boardCp = undoMove(tempBoard, move)
     }

    return move
}

Now, how can i generalize this algorithm to N moves ahead? I'm not a recursion expert, so thanks for any help!

PS: I'm using Java, but any language or pseudo-code is welcome!

share|improve this question
    
this is java? looks more like javascript to me. – 75inchpianist Feb 19 '13 at 18:48
    
It doesn't matter, i just tried to avoid raw pseudo-code! – Fernando Feb 19 '13 at 18:50
    
ha ok just making sure u weren't expected java to interpret that, working on an answer now. – 75inchpianist Feb 19 '13 at 18:51
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This can be easily modified to take N moves ahead into account. Either in a recursive or iterative fashion.

bestMove = function(Board board, piece piece, int lookAhead)
{
 possibleMoves = getPossibleMoves(board, piece)
 bestMove = null
 bestScore = -INFINITY
 boardCp = clone(board)     

 for (move in possibleMoves)
 {
    /* just the original code */
     if(lookAhead <= 1) {
         tempBoard = applyMove(boardCp, move)
         if (tempBoard.score > bestScore)
         {
             bestMove = move
             bestScore = tempBoard.score
          }
         boardCp = undoMove(tempBoard, move)
     }

     /* recursion, can be changed to a loop */
     else {
        tempBoard = applyMove(boardCp, move)                // apply
        move2 = bestMove(tempBoard, piece, lookAhead-1)     // dive and get best 
        boardCp = undoMove(tempBoard, move)                 // (1) check how good it actually is
        tempBoard = applyMove(boardCp, move2)
        if (tempBoard.score > bestScore)
         {
             bestMove = move2
             bestScore = tempBoard.score
          }
        boardCp = undoMove(tempBoard, move2)                // generaly I'd refactor both if-else paths and reuse some code
     }
  }

return bestMove
}    

if you can return 2 values from a function then (1) wouldn't be necessary - you need the move and it's score.

BTW. Have you read about min-max, alfa-beta (with pruning) algorithms?

share|improve this answer
    
I know how to implement Min-Max with alpha beta pruning, but can i apply to this case? – Fernando Feb 19 '13 at 19:00
    
Your pseudo-code is a very good candidate for a min-max-like algorithm, this is essentially what you are doing. What exactly are you asking? – emesx Feb 19 '13 at 19:02
    
The min-max takes relative scores to evaluate moves, but in this case i don't have an 'opponent', that's why i didn't try to apply it...unless i'm missing some concept about this kind of algorithm. – Fernando Feb 19 '13 at 19:05
    
I'm not saying that you must use any particular algorithm, I just mentioned those two because they have the same notion of recursive look-ahead. BTW. if you really need the a-b or min-max alg. then you could always mock the opponent with a constant (0) score/move ;-) – emesx Feb 19 '13 at 19:09
    
Min-Max with alpha-beta always cracks my mind, thanks! – Fernando Feb 19 '13 at 19:12

purely recursive algorithm. No idea how your next pieces is organized though, so here i used a queue to assume. Cloning isnt most efficient though, so kinda depends on your data structure.

 function getBestPossibleScore(Board board, Queue<piece>nextPieces){
         if (nextPieces.isEmpty())
             return board.score;
         piece = piece.pop();
         possibleMoves = getPossibleMoves(board, piece)   

         bestScore = -INFINITY
         boardCp = clone(board)     

         for (move in possibleMoves)
         {
             tempBoard = applyMove(boardCp, move)
             curentScore = getBestPossibleScore(tempBoard,nextPieces.clone());
             if (currentScore > bestScore)
             {            
                 bestScore = currentScore
              }
             boardCp = undoMove(tempBoard, move)
          }

        return board.score+bestScore;
    }
     function getBestMove(Board board, Queue<piece> nextPieces)
        {

         piece = piece.pop();
         possibleMoves = getPossibleMoves(board, piece)   
         bestMove=null;
         bestScore = -INFINITY
         boardCp = clone(board)     

         for (move in possibleMoves)
         {
             tempBoard = applyMove(boardCp, move)
             currentScore = getBestPossibleScore(tempBoard,nextPieces.clone());
             if (currentScore > bestScore)
             {            
                 bestScore = currentScore
                 bestMove=move;
              }
             boardCp = undoMove(tempBoard, move)
          }

        return bestMove
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Hum...your code looks like 2-moves look ahead...or i missing something? – Fernando Feb 19 '13 at 19:48
    
it looks nextPieces.size() ahead. It keeps popping the top piece off, and checking all of its moves, then calls the rest of the pieces on each move, to determine which move will lead to the greatest score – 75inchpianist Feb 19 '13 at 19:51
    
Hum...but for each board state there's only the top piece available, you cannot switch pieces - it's like a chess move variant! I'm very slow to understand recursion, but i'm starting to see it. thanks! – Fernando Feb 19 '13 at 19:53
    
I think there's a typo on your code, there's no recursion - that's why i'm confused. I should be getBestMove(), not getBestMoveScore() on the first for loop at the top. Am i right? – Fernando Feb 19 '13 at 20:02
    
typo ya, but not the move one, should be getBestPossibleScore. – 75inchpianist Feb 19 '13 at 20:06

i can't help you, but i can suggest to you this MinMax algorithm this is what i have used in my AI university course.

Pseudocode, if can be useful:

function integer minimax(node, depth)
  if node is a terminal node or depth <= 0:
    return the heuristic value of node
  α = -∞
  for child in node:       # evaluation is identical for both players 
    α = max(α, -minimax(child, depth-1))
  return α

this algorithm assets that the opponents do his best moves (based on an evaluation function)

share|improve this answer

Taking a psuedocode approach to this. My first choice would always be minimax w/ alpha beta pruning because it is a common and proven method to solving problems similar to yours.

But in the event you want to do something different.

List moves = new list()
Best board = current board    

While (queue is not empty){
    grab the next item in the queue.
    Implement your algorithm.
    add the move to the move list.
    update the best board
}

Not the greatest but a very simple approach that then provides you with a list of moves based on the queue. You would just have to transfer the board state from the previous best board into the algorithm board element and the next piece from the queue into the piece argument of your algorithm.

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