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I have to following code to check whether the entity in my model has a nullable=false or similar annotation on a field.

import javax.persistence.Column;
import .....

private boolean isRequired(Item item, Object propertyId) {
        Class<?> property = getPropertyClass(item, propertyId);

        final JoinColumn joinAnnotation = property.getAnnotation(JoinColumn.class);
        if (null != joinAnnotation) {
            return !joinAnnotation.nullable();
        }

        final Column columnAnnotation = property.getAnnotation(Column.class);
        if (null != columnAnnotation) {
            return !columnAnnotation.nullable();
        }

        ....
        return false;
    }

Here's a snippet from my model.

import javax.persistence.*;
import .....

@Entity
@Table(name="m_contact_details")
public class MContactDetail extends AbstractMasterEntity implements Serializable {

    @Column(length=60, nullable=false)
    private String address1;

For those people unfamiliar with the @Column annotation, here's the header:

@Target({METHOD, FIELD})
@Retention(RUNTIME)
public @interface Column {

I'd expect the isRequired to return true every now and again, but instead it never does. I've already done a mvn clean and mvn install on my project, but that does not help.

Q1: What am I doing wrong?

Q2: is there a cleaner way to code isRequired (perhaps making better use of generics)?

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Is you @Column annotation persistent? Is it maybe always null? Can you share part of the @Column interface? –  Anony-Mousse Feb 19 '13 at 18:51
    
It's part of the javax.persistence api. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Feb 19 '13 at 18:53
    
Notice that @Column is an annotation on a field, not on a class. –  Anony-Mousse Feb 19 '13 at 18:57
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. property represents a class (it's a Class<?>)
  2. @Column and @JoinColumn can only annotate fields/methods.

Consequently you will never find these annotations on property.

A slightly modified version of your code that prints out whether the email property of the Employee entity is required:

public static void main(String[] args) throws NoSuchFieldException {
      System.out.println(isRequired(Employee.class, "email"));
}

private static boolean isRequired(Class<?> entity, String propertyName) throws NoSuchFieldException {
    Field property = entity.getDeclaredField(propertyName);

    final JoinColumn joinAnnotation = property.getAnnotation(JoinColumn.class);
    if (null != joinAnnotation) {
        return !joinAnnotation.nullable();
    }

    final Column columnAnnotation = property.getAnnotation(Column.class);
    if (null != columnAnnotation) {
        return !columnAnnotation.nullable();
    }

    return false;
}

Note that this is a half-baked solution, because JPA annotations can either be on a field or on a method. Also be aware of the difference between the reflection methods like getFiled()/getDeclaredField(). The former returns inherited fields too, while the latter returns only fields of the specific class ignoring what's inherited from its parents.

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OK, so how do I get to the annotation for the field? –  Johan Feb 19 '13 at 19:02
    
You need to get the Field from the Class object and use the same getAnnotation() method. –  zagyi Feb 19 '13 at 19:10
    
Thanks a million this was exactly what I needed, see the final working code below. –  Johan Feb 19 '13 at 19:58
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The following code works:

    @SuppressWarnings("rawtypes")
    private boolean isRequired(BeanItem item, Object propertyId) throws SecurityException {

        String fieldname = propertyId.toString();

        try {
            java.lang.reflect.Field field = item.getBean().getClass().getDeclaredField(fieldname);
            final JoinColumn joinAnnotation = field.getAnnotation(JoinColumn.class);
            if (null != joinAnnotation) {
                return !joinAnnotation.nullable();
            }

            final Column columnAnnotation = field.getAnnotation(Column.class);
            if (null != columnAnnotation) {
                return !columnAnnotation.nullable();
            }



        } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
            //not a problem no need to log this event.
            return false;
        } 
    }
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