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I'm using jQuery 1.9.1. I have a custom function that does some operations an then performing an $.ajax call. I would like to call this function in sequence. I've tried $.when, but it does not solve my problem.

function func(param) {
    //some operations
    $.ajax()
}

main() {
    //first call
    func(param1);
    //wait for done and the run the second
    func(param2);
}
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Have you considered using callbacks? –  Jay Blanchard Feb 19 '13 at 18:54
    
AJAX = Asynchronous JavaScript and XML. Without using callbacks, you would need to make this synchronous instead. –  crush Feb 19 '13 at 18:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can return you ajax call as a deferred which gives you access to the done function. http://api.jquery.com/category/deferred-object/

Check out Shauna's answer for a deeper explanation of ajax.

function func(param) {
    //some operations
    return $.ajax()
}

main() {
    //first call
    func(param1).done(function(){
       //wait for done and the run the second
       func(param2);
    });

}
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An elegant solution. Doesn't explain to the user why it wasn't working initially though. –  crush Feb 19 '13 at 19:17

AJAX calls are asynchronous, which means you will never be able to call them in order the way you're doing it.

What you'll want to do, instead, is harness the callback functions in the $.ajax() call. You'd end up with something like this:

function func(param) {
   // Other stuff
   $.ajax({
      success: func(param2)
   })
}

Be careful of infinite loops, though, since you're calling the same function. It might be worthwhile to look at the jQuery source for the ajax() method and see how they handle the callbacks, and write your methods in a similar fashion, so you could end up with something like:

main() {
   func(param1, {success: func(param2)});
}

(Note: $.ajax() does have an async setting, which you can set to false, but IMO, it's a good idea to get a good understanding of how AJAX and callbacks work, because you'll be working with the intended behavior, instead of against it, which will save you headaches in the long run. Additionally, large synchronous AJAX calls can cause your site to be unresponsive, which is bad for your user experience.)

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+1 for explaining it. Let's just hope that the user actually read this and learned instead of just accepting what seemed to work. –  crush Feb 19 '13 at 19:17

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