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I have a huge file from which I need data for specific entries. File structure is:

>Entry1.1
#size=1688
704 1   1   1   4
979 2   2   2   0
1220    1   1   1   4
1309    1   1   1   4
1316    1   1   1   4
1372    1   1   1   4
1374    1   1   1   4
1576    1   1   1   4
>Entry2.1
#size=6251
6110    3   1.5 0   2
6129    2   2   2   2
6136    1   1   1   4
6142    3   3   3   2
6143    4   4   4   1
6150    1   1   1   4
6152    1   1   1   4
>Entry3.2
#size=1777
AND SO ON-----------

What I have to achieve is that I need to extract all the lines (complete record) for certain entries. For e.x. I need record for Entry1.1 than I can use name of entry '>Entry1.1' till next '>' as markers in REGEX to extract lines in between. But I do not know how to build such complex REGEX expressions. Once I have such expression the I will put it a FOR loop:

For entry in entrylist:
    GET record from big_file
    DO some processing
    WRITE in result file

What could be the REGEX to perform such extraction of record for specific entries? Is there any more pythonic way to achieve this? I would appreciate your help on this.

AK

share|improve this question
    
Ah thank you . I hadn't seen that you have seen my answer. If you need improvements, ask. For example, it would be interesting that the user could enter 1 1 instead of 1.1 –  eyquem Feb 19 '13 at 20:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With regex

import re

ss = '''
>Entry1.1
#size=1688
704 1   1   1   4
979 2   2   2   0
1220    1   1   1   4
1309    1   1   1   4
1316    1   1   1   4
1372    1   1   1   4
1374    1   1   1   4
1576    1   1   1   4
>Entry2.1
#size=6251
6110    3   1.5 0   2
6129    2   2   2   2
6136    1   1   1   4
6142    3   3   3   2
6143    4   4   4   1
6150    1   1   1   4
6152    1   1   1   4
>Entry3.2
#size=1777
AND SO ON-----------
'''

patbase = '(>Entry *%s(?![^\n]+?\d).+?)(?=>|(?:\s*\Z))'


while True:
    x = raw_input('What entry do you want ? : ')
    found = re.findall(patbase % x, ss, re.DOTALL)
    if found:
        print 'found ==',found
        for each_entry in found:
            print '\n%s\n' % each_entry
    else:
        print '\n ** There is no such an entry **\n'

Explanation of '(>Entry *%s(?![^\n]+?\d).+?)(?=>|(?:\s*\Z))' :

1)

%s receives the reference of entry: 1.1 , 2 , 2.1 etc

2)

The portion (?![^\n]+?\d) is to do a verification.

(?![^\n]+?\d) is a negative look-ahead assertion that says that what is after %s must not be [^\n]+?\d that is to say any characters [^\n]+? before a digit \d

I write [^\n] to mean "any character except a newline \n".
I am obliged to write this instead of simply .+? because I put the flag re.DOTALL and the pattern portion .+? would be acting until the end of the entry.
However, I only want to verify that after the entered reference (represented by %s in the pattern), there won't be supplementary digits before the end OF THE LINE, entered by error

All that is because if there is an Entry2.1 but no Entry2 , and the user enters only 2 because he wants Entry2 and no other, the regex would detect the presence of the Entry2.1 and would yield it, though the user would really like Entry2 in fact.

3)

At the end of '(>Entry *%s(?![^\n]+?\d).+?) , the part .+? will catch the complete block of the Entry, because the dot represents any character, comprised a newline \n
It's for this aim that I put the flag re.DOTALLin order to make the following pattern portion .+? capable to pass the newlines until the end of the entry.

4)

I want the matching to stop at the end of the Entry desired, not inside the next one, so that the group defined by the parenthesises in (>Entry *%s(?![^\n]+?\d).+?) will catch exactly what we want
Hence, I put at the end a positive look-ahaed assertion (?=>|(?:\s*\Z)) that says that the character before which the running ungreedy .+? must stop to match is either > (beginning of the next Entry) or the end of the string \Z.
As it is possible that the end of the last Entry wouldn't exactly be the end of the entire string, I put \s* that means "possible whitespaces before the very end".
So \s*\Z means "there can be whitespaces before to bump into the end of the string" Whitespaces are a blank, \f, \n, \r, \t, \v

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks...Worked like a charm.... –  Bade Feb 19 '13 at 20:17
1  
Thank you. Note that I used found = re.findall(patbase % x, ss, re.DOTALL) , thinking that It could be possible that there would be several Entry with the same reference. If it is not the case, you should simplify the code by writing directly print '\n%s\n' % re.search(patbase % x, ss, re.DOTALL).group() - The print 'found ==',found is a cinder without need –  eyquem Feb 19 '13 at 20:44

Not entirely sure what you're asking. Does this get you any closer? It will put all your entries as dictionary keys and a list of all its entries. Assuming it is formatted like I believe it is. Does it have duplicate entries? Here's what I've got:

entries = {}
key = ''
for entry in open('entries.txt'):
    if entry.startswith('>Entry'):
       key = entry[1:].strip() # removes > and newline
       entries[key] = []
    else:
       entries[key].append(entry)
share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry if I was not clear enough. Actually the file is too big (~1GB) so I just wanted a string match and than extract the entry. Answer from 'eyquem' did the job perfectly well. –  Bade Feb 19 '13 at 20:19
    
That's fine. No need to apologize :-) Sorry I couldn't be of more help. –  Hoopdady Feb 19 '13 at 20:25
1  
@Atul If the file is very big , it could be problematic to use a regex, since it needs to load the complete content of the file into memory. Exploring a file by chunks with a regex need some tricky processes, for a desired portion of text searched with a regex could overlapp on two chunks if chunks are not overlapping themselves. Am I clear ? –  eyquem Feb 19 '13 at 20:48

I'm no good with regexes, so I try to look for non-regex solutions whenever I can. In Python, the natural place to store iteration logic is in a generator, and so I'd use something like this (no-itertools-required version):

def group_by_marker(seq, marker):
    group = []
    # advance past negatives at start
    for line in seq:
        if marker(line):
            group = [line]
            break
    for line in seq:
        # found a new group start; yield what we've got
        # and start over
        if marker(line) and group:
            yield group
            group = []
        group.append(line)
    # might have extra bits left..
    if group:
        yield group

In your example case, we get:

>>> with open("entry0.dat") as fp:
...     marker = lambda line: line.startswith(">Entry")
...     for group in group_by_marker(fp, marker):
...         print(repr(group[0]), len(group))
...         
'>Entry1.1\n' 10
'>Entry2.1\n' 9
'>Entry3.2\n' 4

One advantage to this approach is that we never have to keep more than one group in memory, so it's handy for really large files. It's not nearly as fast as a regex, although if the file is 1 GB you're probably I/O bound anyhow.

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