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I have a project, where I bind a checkbox's IsChecked property with a get/set in the codebehind. However, when the application loads, it doesn't update, for some reason. Intrigued, I stripped it down to its basics, like this:

//using statements
namespace NS
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        private bool _test;
        public bool Test
        {
            get { Console.WriteLine("Accessed!"); return _test; }
            set { Console.WriteLine("Changed!"); _test = value; }
        }
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            Test = true;
        }
    }
}

XAML:

<Window x:Class="TheTestingProject_WPF_.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525" DataContext="{Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}">
<Grid>
    <Viewbox>
        <CheckBox IsChecked="{Binding Path=Test, Mode=TwoWay, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}"/>
    </Viewbox>
</Grid>

And, lo and behold, when I set it to true, it did not update!

Anyone can come up with a fix, or explain why?

Thanks, it'd be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Read introductory material. –  H.B. Feb 19 '13 at 19:38
2  
I don't think I deserve a downvote because I read another source and not MSDN... –  It'sNotALie. Feb 19 '13 at 19:40
2  
@ofstream I didn't downvote, but I suspect it's because this question doesn't show any research effort. This problem is extremely basic, and anyone who works with WPF's binding system knows that you need to implement INotifyPropertyChanged to make your properties notify the UI to reevaluate the binding when they get changed. Pretty much every single WPF tutorial that introduces bindings covers this concept. –  Rachel Feb 19 '13 at 19:44
    
That's exactly like saying newbs deserve downvotes because they don't know how to use basic methods. It's lack of knowledge. WPF is quite new to me. –  It'sNotALie. Feb 19 '13 at 19:46
2  
@ofstream The downvote wasn't for your lack of knowledge, it was for your lack of research effort –  Rachel Feb 19 '13 at 19:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

In order to support two-way binding, your data object must implement INotifyPropertyChanged

Also, it's always a good idea to Separate Data from Presentation

public class ViewModel: INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private bool _test;
    public bool Test
    {  get { return _test; }
       set
       {
           _test = value;
           NotifyPropertyChanged("Test");
       }
    }

    public PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    public void NotifyPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
         if (PropertyChanged != null)
             PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
}

<Window x:Class="TheTestingProject_WPF_.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
<Grid>
    <Viewbox>
        <CheckBox IsChecked="{Binding Path=Test, Mode=TwoWay, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}"/>
    </Viewbox>
</Grid>

Code Behind:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        DataContext = new ViewModel{Test = true};
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That works, thanks! I'll accept you when SO lets me :) –  It'sNotALie. Feb 19 '13 at 19:43
    
short, clean and easy to understand. thanks! –  mcy Nov 8 '13 at 12:35

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