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I am implementing a singleton class in Java to make sure no more than one instance of the class is created.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Perhaps the best way is to use an enum with a single instance. This has the added benefit of being serializable and guaranteeing singleton-ness against serialization and reflection, which no "straightforward" Singleton implementation does (private? I have reflection, I scoff derisively at your access modifiers!). It's also very simple to implement:

public enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;

    // fields and methods go here
}
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+1 for scoffing at access modifiers. I lol'd. :) –  corsiKa Mar 30 '11 at 17:07

The best way to make a singleton? Use an enum.

public enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;
    public void foo(){ ... }
}

// Usage:
Singleton.INSTANCE.foo();

You get lots of help from the VM not only to avoid double instantiation, but it also helps you avoid deserialization corruption.

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public class Singleton {
  public static final Singleton INSTANCE = new Singleton();
  private Singleton() { ... }
}

Using a static instance variable is preferred to the internal "Holder" class. If you like, you can also make the static member private and provide a method for accessing it, but all that does is add another method call to the stack.

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It rather depends what you're trying to achieve as to what is preferred - the holder gives you a lazy singleton, the simpler version doesn't give you lazy loading. –  Pete Kirkham Sep 30 '09 at 8:09
    
Yes, it does. Java doesn't load classes until they're first used. –  Michael Borgwardt Sep 30 '09 at 8:11
1  
Not entirely true. It loads them when they're first referenced, e.g. in the method signature of another class. –  skaffman Sep 30 '09 at 8:48
    
Accessor methods are normally inlined by the VM. Do not choose public field over accessor to get rid of a "method call on the stack" - in your code, it will look like a method call, but in reality, it'll be the same thing. –  gustafc Sep 30 '09 at 8:56

What about lazy instanciation: getInstance() returns the singleton or create it if it is the first call.

 public class MySingleton
 {
     private static MySingleton instance;

     private MySingleton()
     {
         // construct object . . .
     }

     // For lazy initialization
     public static synchronized MySingleton getInstance()
     {
         if (instance==null)
         {
             instance = new MySingleton();
         }
         return instance;
     }

     // Remainder of class definition . . .
 }
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1  
Lazy instantiation is almost never necessary, and if it is, Java loads classes lazily, so creating the instance in the declaration actually is lazy instantiation - without synchronization overhead (in very rare cases that's not lazy enough and skaffman's answer is better). –  Michael Borgwardt Sep 30 '09 at 8:26
    
Also note this implementation synchronizes every attempt to obtain a reference to the instance. Since most code will do something like: Singleton.getInstance.doSomething(); Singleton.getInstance.doSomethingElse(); The overall effect would be additional synchronization severely limiting concurrency with no thread safety guarantees in terms of member access/mutation. –  Tim Bender Sep 30 '09 at 8:49
    
Double-checked locking in java is broken javaworld.com/jw-02-2001/jw-0209-double.html In short, this way of guaranteeing that this class is instantiated only once may result in hard-to-find concurrency issues. Never use this. –  Buhb Sep 30 '09 at 9:29
2  
DCL is non-broken as of Java 5. Check out cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html, scroll down to "Under the new Java Memory Model". –  gustafc Sep 30 '09 at 21:10

Singletons are not threadsafe per default. The common way to create a singleton is to have a factory method that handles creation of the one instance. That way you can control instance creation.

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If you care about concurrency, you won't be using shared global state.

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2  
If the singleton holds the accumulation of results from a singular parallelized problem why not? A singleton epitomizes global state, and as such it would be a fair usage scenario. –  Ande Sep 30 '09 at 9:13
1  
There are several use cases for classes represented with only one instance that is shared between processes. A typical well designed webapp using spring will probably have a bunch of classes instantiated in singleton scope, shared between worker threads. –  Buhb Sep 30 '09 at 9:32

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