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How can I add all the values of the key gozhi? Note that 'gozhi' key is dynamic.

<?php
Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [gozhi] => 2
            [uzorong] => 1
            [ngangla] => 4
            [langthel] => 5
        )

    [1] => Array
        (
            [gozhi] => 5
            [uzorong] => 0
            [ngangla] => 3
            [langthel] => 2
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [gozhi] => 3
            [uzorong] => 0
            [ngangla] => 1
            [langthel] => 3
        )
)
?>

Example result:

Array
(
    [gozhi] => 10
    [uzorong] => 1
    [ngangla] => 8
    [langthel] => 10
)
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Already solved it :) sorry for posting hehe –  marknt15 Sep 30 '09 at 8:08
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7 Answers

up vote 29 down vote accepted
$sumArray = array();

foreach ($myArray as $k=>$subArray) {
  foreach ($subArray as $id=>$value) {
    $sumArray[$id]+=$value;
  }
}

print_r($sumArray);
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18  
That will throw notices for the first iteration as the keys don’t exist yet. –  Gumbo Sep 30 '09 at 8:26
    
If there are n arrays? –  Rana Muhammad Usman Apr 16 at 13:51
1  
@RanaMuhammadUsman: If there are n arrays, use this solution. –  Amal Murali May 11 at 6:08
    
Why php can do it with out foreach? –  Asuraya Jun 30 at 9:50
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Here's a version where the array keys may not be the same for both arrays, but you want them all to be there in the final array.

function array_add_by_key( $array1, $array2 ) {
    foreach ( $array2 as $k => $a ) {
        if ( array_key_exists( $k, $array1 ) ) {
            $array1[$k] += $a;
        } else {
            $array1[$k] = $a;
        }
    }
    return $array1;
}
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It can also be done using array_walk:

function array_sum_values(array $input, $key) {
   $sum = 0;
   array_walk($input, function($item, $index, $params) {
         if (!empty($item[$params[1]]))
            $params[0] += $item[$params[1]];
      }, array(&$sum, $key)
   );
   return $sum;
}

var_dump(array_sum_values($arr, 'gozhi'));

Not so readable like previous solutions but it works :)

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It can also be done using array_map

$rArray = array(
    0 => array(
        'gozhi' => 2,
        'uzorong' => 1,
        'ngangla' => 4,
        'langthel' => 5
    ),
    1 => array(
        'gozhi' => 5,
        'uzorong' => 0,
        'ngangla' => 3,
        'langthel' => 2
    ),
    2 => array(
        'gozhi' => 3,
        'uzorong' => 0,
        'ngangla' => 1,
        'langthel' => 3
    ),
);

$sumResult = array_map("sum", $rArray[0], $rArray[1], $rArray[2]);

function sum($arr1, $arr2, $arr3)
{
    return($arr1+$arr2+$arr3);
}
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Perfect for n numbers of array –  Dushyant Joshi Mar 25 at 6:29
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Another version, with some benefits below.

$sum = ArrayHelper::copyKeys($arr[0]);

foreach ($arr as $item) {
    ArrayHelper::addArrays($sum, $item);
}


class ArrayHelper {

    public function addArrays(Array &$to, Array $from) {
        foreach ($from as $key=>$value) {
            $to[$key] += $value;
        }
    }

    public function copyKeys(Array $from, $init=0) {
        return array_fill_keys(array_keys($from), $init);
    }

}

I wanted to combine the best of Gumbo's, Graviton's, and Chris J's answer with the following goals so I could use this in my app:

a) Initialize the 'sum' array keys outside of the loop (Gumbo). Should help with performance on very large arrays (not tested yet!). Eliminates notices.

b) Main logic is easy to understand without hitting the manuals. (Graviton, Chris J).

c) Solve the more general problem of adding the values of any two arrays with the same keys and make it less dependent on the sub-array structure.

Unlike Gumbo's solution, you could reuse this in cases where the values are not in sub arrays. Imagine in the example below that $arr1 and $arr2 are not hard-coded, but are being returned as the result of calling a function inside a loop.

$arr1 = array(
    'gozhi' => 2,
    'uzorong' => 1,
    'ngangla' => 4,
    'langthel' => 5
);

$arr2 = array(
   'gozhi' => 5,
   'uzorong' => 0,
   'ngangla' => 3,
   'langthel' => 2
);

$sum = ArrayHelper::copyKeys($arr1);

ArrayHelper::addArrays($sum, $arr1);
ArrayHelper::addArrays($sum, $arr2);
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Here is a solution similar to the two others:

$acc = array_shift($arr);
foreach ($arr as $val) {
    foreach ($val as $key => $val) {
        $acc[$key] += $val;
    }
}

But this doesn’t need to check if the array keys already exist and doesn’t throw notices neither.

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+1 very clever solution for this specific array structure. Too bad it doesn't work in the more general case of arrays all structured like the final result. –  Todd Chaffee Feb 19 '12 at 13:37
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$newarr=array();
foreach($arrs as $value)
{
  foreach($value as $key=>$secondValue)
   {
       if(!isset($newarr[$key]))
        {
           $newarr[$key]=0;
        }
       $newarr[$key]+=$secondValue;
   }
}
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2  
Note that this will give you PHP notices (undefined index) every time you access $newarr[$key] on the right side of your assignment, when such values does not yet exist. –  Anti Veeranna Sep 30 '09 at 8:07
    
I think I add a check to initialize the $newarr[$key] –  Graviton Sep 30 '09 at 8:08
4  
What? I got voted down? For what reason? –  Graviton Sep 30 '09 at 8:26
    
PLEASE leave comments if you vote someone down... There is no way to improve the solution if you don't leave comments. –  Todd Chaffee Feb 20 '12 at 10:56
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