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I've been trying to figure this one out all day but cant seem to explain, or get across what I'm trying to achieve. Lets say I have 2 arrays:

Array
(
    [1] => Array
        (
            [2] => Dashboard
        )

)

and

Array
(
    [1] => Array
        (
            [3] => Toasts
        )

)

What I want to be able to do is merge the 2 arrays as follows:

Array
(
    [1] => Array
        (
            [2] => Dashboard,
            [3] => Toasts
        )

)

But, if I have something like this:

Array
(
    [1] => Array
        (
            [2] => Dashboard
        )

)
Array
(
    [1] => Array
        (
            [2] => Toasts
        )

)

I dont want to loose the value of the overriding element but increment it like so

Array
(
    [1] => Array
        (
            [2] => Dashboard,
            [3] => Toasts
        )

)

I have tried everything from array merge, recursive merge and even eval but I just can get my head around it. Has anyone come across this before? a function I haven't found?

share|improve this question
    
How would it behave, if the two arrays have overlapping keys? –  Maciej Gurban Feb 19 '13 at 20:53
    
So, you want to know how many times a value appears in different arrays? –  EmCo Feb 19 '13 at 20:53
    
In same array, you cannot escape overwriting the same keyed values cos of keys are uniq always. –  Qeremy Feb 19 '13 at 20:58
    
@Dih the last section explains that the key would increment by 1 if the key exists. @ EmCo no, im not sure what your saying there, sorry –  Luke Snowden Feb 19 '13 at 20:58
    
it doesn't work and even if it did it would overwrite clashing keys/values –  Luke Snowden Feb 19 '13 at 21:02

2 Answers 2

You should be using $array['indexname'] = 'value';. array_merge() or array_push() doesn't maintain the values having same/associative keys while merging, because there is no way to determine the next key.

share|improve this answer
    
The numerical keys are actually ordering positions. i.e. someone writes a plugin for something that im working on and sets the navigation position to '3.3.6', it will live in sixth position, of the third link in the third category. –  Luke Snowden Feb 19 '13 at 21:12

Maybe not a real answer but just a way to escape overwriting;

$a1 = array(array(2 => 'Dashboard'));
$a2 = array(array(3 => 'Toasts'));
$a3 = array(array(3 => 'Foo'));
$array = array();
foreach (array_merge($a1, $a2, $a3) as $a) {
    foreach ($a as $i => $value) {
        if (!isset($array[$i])) {
            $array[$i] = $value;
        } else {
            $array[] = $value;
        }
    }
}
print_r($array);
Array
(
    [2] => Dashboard
    [3] => Toasts
    [4] => Foo
)
share|improve this answer
    
hi @qeremy, thanks to looking into this but this may fail on larger matrices. I didnt add that into the question because I asked this a while ago and no one could understand what I wanted to achieve. –  Luke Snowden Feb 19 '13 at 21:08

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