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I find a lot of resources on how to react on an Event (or delegate). For example:

Control.ValueChanged += (sender, e) =>
        {
            //do something
        };

However, I don't find how I can create my own Event? Basically I have a class that needs to 'fire' an event and in the class that creates this object you can react on this Event.

Any idea?

If I would do it with a Delegate instead, how should I do that (creating my own Delegate object that can be implemented by another class)?

Thanks!

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You mean something like this?

class Foo
{
    public event EventHandler MyEvent;

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        // do stuff

        // raise the MyEvent event
        var handler = MyEvent;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks everyone! – Matt Feb 20 '13 at 20:57

I personally use Actions.

public abstract class ServiceClient
{
    public Action OnNetworkActivityStarted { get; set; }

    private void StartNetworkActivity()
    {
        if (OnNetworkActivityStarted != null)
            OnNetworkActivityStarted();
    }
}

Any inheriting class would/could use the logic you have provided above.

public class MyClient : ServiceClient
{
    public MyClient()
    {
        this.OnNetworkActivityStarted += () => 
        {
            //do whatever the subclass needs to do when the event is fired
        };    
    }
}

I have this implemented in class-library I plan on using for cross-platform mobile apps. This allows each device to implement their own strategy for letting the user know that network has started.

I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

You have two different things you could do depending on what you want:

  • You can create a variable holding a delegate (the variable type would be of the said delegate). You mostly do that when you want to be able to implement a functionality outside your object. You can also return a value using this thing, so you can use that for changing the state of the object.

  • You can create an event. You do that when you want to be able to prevent some objects that something happened in your object: you fire an event. Your object should not be aware at all at what is happening after. That's typically what you do when implementing a View, you fire some events so the Controller can be aware of what is going in View. He can then decide what to do with the View after.

First example, the name retrieval is not defined in the controller, it has to be set by outside. The Controller has no idea of how it works but it wants to retrieve a name for an integer id. It works kind of the same as an interface:

public class MyController {
    private NameForIDFetcher NameFetcher { get; set; }
    private List<int> _ids = new List<int>();

    public delegate string NameForIDFetcher(int id);


    public void showNames() {
        if (this.NameFetcher == null) {
            throw new Exception("No NameFetcher set.");
        }

        foreach (int id in this._ids) {
            Console.WriteLine(id + ": " + this.NameFetcher(id));
        }
    }
}

Second example, the view can prevent all the listeners who might be connected to the events when it appears and when it disappears. The view shouldn't change its behaviour if no one is connected though (please let me know if someone knows a case where it should). You can note that I used Action the second time, which is a generic delegate returning void and taking the template you give it in parameters. You can up to 16 template parameters meaning the delegate would take 16 parameters, but that would be a really nasty delegate wouldn't it?

public class MyView {

    public event ViewAction onViewAppeared;
    public event Action<MyView> onViewDisappeared;

    public delegate void ViewAction(MyView view);

    public void show() {
        // Stuffs

        if (this.onViewAppeared != null) {
            this.onViewAppeared(this);
        }
    }

    public void hide() {
        // Stufs

        if (this.onViewDisappeared != null) {
            this.onViewDisappeared(this);
        }
    }
}
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