Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In the jQuery add documentation, it lists an add(html) overload which describes the html argument as:

An HTML fragment to add to the set of matched elements.

Since there is already an add(element) overload, I assume this means that you pass it an HTML string, as in:

var set = $();
set.add("<div></div>");
document.write(set.length); // prints 0

However, when this code is run, it has no effect on the jQuery wrapped set. What am I missing?

share|improve this question
    
I doubt this is what you are looking for, but if you use the push method rather than the add method, it DOES result in a length of 1. May I ask what the purpose of this code is? – bobbybee Feb 19 '13 at 22:04
    
in that link just a few scrolls down it says this very clearly: "The following will not save the added elements, because the .add() method creates a new set and leaves the original set in pdiv unchanged: 12 var pdiv = $("p");pdiv.add("div"); // WRONG, pdiv will not change" – Kyle C Feb 19 '13 at 22:05
    
@bobbybee: Do you know if push is part of the official jQuery API? – cdmckay Feb 19 '13 at 22:09
    
@cdmckay I doubt it. It's standard ECMAScript (what JS and AS3 are based off of), so probably JavaScript. – bobbybee Feb 19 '13 at 22:11
    
@bobbybee: It's standard ECMAScript for Arrays, not jQuery objects. Anyway, I can't find it on the jQuery site, and this post discourages its use: stackoverflow.com/questions/14524024/jquery-push-function – cdmckay Feb 19 '13 at 22:13
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You got to set the return of add to the set like below,

set = set.add("<div></div>");

.add returns the collated jQuery object which you can chain, it doesn't really add it to the original object.

share|improve this answer
    
Doh, rookie mistake. I forgot that it always returns a new set. – cdmckay Feb 19 '13 at 22:05

It works fine if you define it in a single line: http://jsfiddle.net/s2zQr/3/

var set = $().add("<div></div>");
document.write(set.length);

as @Pavel Chernov noted... the .add() method creates a new set (and that's why your count never updated)

share|improve this answer

The following will not save the added elements, because the .add() method creates a new set and leaves the original set in pdiv unchanged:

var pdiv = $("p");
pdiv.add("div"); // WRONG, pdiv will not change

so your set is still empty

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.