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So lets say I had the string.

 $my str = "Hello how are you today. Oh thats good I'm glad you are happy. Thats wonderful; thats fantastic."

I want to create a hash table where each key is a unique word and the value is the number of times it appears in the string i.e., I want it to be an automated process.

my %words {
  "Hello" => 1,
  "are" => 2,
  "thats" => 2,
  "Thats" => 1
  };

I honestly am brand new to PERL and have no clue how to do this, how to handle the punctuation etc.

UPDATE:

Also, is it possible to use

   split('.!?;',$mystring)   

Not with this syntax, but basically split at a . or ! or ? etc.. oh and ' ' (whitespace)

share|improve this question
    
How do you want to handle punctuation is the question. Is I'm a duplicate of I am, or should it only be a duplicate of itself? Is ultra-complex a duplicate of ultracomplex or not? – TLP Feb 19 '13 at 22:13
    
Anything that is different in anyway should be different. I meant punctuation like .'s !'s ;'s and ?'s. Sorry. – SystemFun Feb 19 '13 at 22:14
    
You'll find some hints here. – Craig Treptow Feb 19 '13 at 22:14
    
also somewhat related: stackoverflow.com/questions/8252547/… – amphibient Feb 19 '13 at 22:46
up vote 4 down vote accepted

One simple way to do it is to split the string on any character that is not a valid word-character in your view. Note that this is by no means an exhaustive solution as it is. I have simply taken a limited set of characters.

You can add valid word-characters inside the brackets [ ... ] as you discover edge cases. You might also search http://search.cpan.org for modules designed for this purpose.

The regex [^ ... ] means match any character that is not inside the brackets. \pL is a larger subset of letters, and the others literal. Dash - must be escaped because it is a meta character inside a character class bracket.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my $str = "Hello how are you today. Oh thats good I'm glad you are happy.
           Thats wonderful; thats fantastic.";
my %hash;
$hash{$_}++                      # increase count for each field
    for                          # in the loop
    split /[^\pL'\-!?]+/, $str;  # over the list from splitting the string 
print Dumper \%hash;

Output:

$VAR1 = {
          'wonderful' => 1,
          'glad' => 1,
          'I\'m' => 1,
          'you' => 2,
          'how' => 1,
          'are' => 2,
          'fantastic' => 1,
          'good' => 1,
          'today' => 1,
          'Hello' => 1,
          'happy' => 1,
          'Oh' => 1,
          'Thats' => 1,
          'thats' => 2
        };
share|improve this answer
    
Ok thanks. how do I account for the fact that Thats is NOT supposed to be thats. – SystemFun Feb 19 '13 at 22:27
    
@Vlad You want to distinguish between upper and lower case? Then change lc($_) to just $_. I'll remove it. – TLP Feb 19 '13 at 22:28
    
ok thanks. I'll have to work on learning that syntax. Is there an error in yours? Why is everything red i.e. a string? – SystemFun Feb 19 '13 at 22:33
    
@Vlad Red? Are you talking about stackoverflow's code highlighting? That's just the single quote making it think its a quoted string. – TLP Feb 19 '13 at 22:34
    
I figured that out haha. Thanks for your help! – SystemFun Feb 19 '13 at 22:35

This will use whitespace to separate words.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $str = "Hello how are you today."
        . " Oh thats good I'm glad you are happy."
        . " Thats wonderful. thats fantastic.";

# Use whitespace to split the string into single "words".
my @words = split /\s+/, $str;

# Store each word in the hash and count its occurrence.
my %hash;
for my $word ( @words ) {
    $hash{ $word }++;
}

# Show each word and its count. Using printf to align output.
for my $key ( sort keys %hash ) {
    printf "\%-10s => \%d\n", $key, $hash{ $key };
}

You will need some fine-tuning to get "real" words.

Hello      => 1
I'm        => 1
Oh         => 1
Thats      => 1
are        => 2
fantastic. => 1
glad       => 1
good       => 1
happy.     => 1
how        => 1
thats      => 2
today.     => 1
wonderful. => 1
you        => 2
share|improve this answer
    
he needs more delimiters than just space. see what i did: my @strAry = split /[:,\.\s\/]+/, $str; – amphibient Feb 19 '13 at 22:32
    
That's what the "will need some fine-tuning" is for. Waiting for homeworkoverflow.com so I can post it there. ;-) – Perleone Feb 19 '13 at 22:34
    
@Perleone so for PERL, I can put a variable in the {} and it will just add it to the hash? How do I access a variable then? And if that variable is already in the Hash what happens? – SystemFun Feb 19 '13 at 22:39
    
@Vlad Yes. $hash{beer} = 5; adds the key beer with the value 5 to %hash. You access it the same way: print $hash{beer}; will output 5. If the key is already present, the value will be overwritten: $hash{beer} = 3;. – Perleone Feb 19 '13 at 22:43
    
oh ok. so the ++ will just add one to the present value? – SystemFun Feb 19 '13 at 22:44

Try this:

use strict;
use warnings;

my $str = "Hello, how are you today. Oh thats good I'm glad you are happy. 
           Thats wonderful.";
my @strAry = split /[:,\.\s\/]+/, $str;
my %strHash;

foreach my $word(@strAry) 
{
    print "\nFOUND WORD: ".$word;
    my $exstCnt = $strHash{$word};

    if(defined($exstCnt)) 
    {
        $exstCnt++;
    } 
    else 
    {
        $exstCnt = 1;
    }

    $strHash{$word} = $exstCnt;
}

print "\n\nNOW REPORTING UNIQUE WORDS:\n";

foreach my $unqWord(sort(keys(%strHash))) 
{
    my $cnt = $strHash{$unqWord};
    print "\n".$unqWord." - ".$cnt." instances";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the double spaced formatting? You don't have to use the concatenation operator to interpolate variables, just enter them in the string "Found word $word\n". You don't need to go over a transition variable to increment the counter, just increment it directly. – TLP Feb 19 '13 at 22:38
    
@Pfoampile so for PERL, I can put a variable in the {} and it will just add it to the hash? How do I access a variable then? And if that variable is already in the Hash what happens? – SystemFun Feb 19 '13 at 22:39
    
yes, @Vlad. $strHash{'Vlad'} = 1; adds key 'Vlad' to the hash and assigns value 1 to it – amphibient Feb 19 '13 at 22:44
    
@TLP, good point. but i think this more verbose way is more intelligible for our beginner Vlad to follow what is going on – amphibient Feb 19 '13 at 22:45
1  
@foampile your explantion is very thourough. I have programmed before, just not in PERL, so it was easy to follow your logic. Thanks :) – SystemFun Feb 19 '13 at 22:47
 use YAML qw(Dump);
 use 5.010;

 my $str = "Hello how are you today. Oh thats good I'm glad you are happy. Thats wonderful; thats fantastic.";
 my @match_words = $str =~ /(\w+)/g;
 my $word_hash = {};
 foreach my $word (sort @match_words) {
     $word_hash->{$word}++;
 }
 say Dump($word_hash);
 # -------output----------
 Hello: 1
 I: 1
 Oh: 1
 Thats: 1
 are: 2
 fantastic: 1
 glad: 1
 good: 1
 happy: 1
 how: 1
 m: 1
 thats: 2
 today: 1
 wonderful: 1
 you: 2
share|improve this answer

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