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php n00b here:

I'm trying to pick a card from a deck.

The class instance is '$test_1' and the function 'pick_card' is a method of that class.

I'd like the function to return 1) the card I want, and 2) the deck, less one card.

Where am I going wrong?

$card, $deck = $test_1->pick_card($play_deck);

public function pick_card(&$deck)
{
    $card = $deck[0];
    echo "picked this card: " . $card . "<br />";
    array_splice($deck,0,0);
    return $card; $deck;
}
share|improve this question
2  
need to return array? return array($card, $deck); and retrive it with list($card, $deck) = func(); – Federico Feb 19 '13 at 22:25
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't return two variables like that in PHP. I note that you are passing $deck to the function by reference, so any modifications you make to that variable will be reflected in that variable as the function operates on it.

That being said, since this is a class, you really shouldn't have to pass a variable at all, you really should have a property that stores your deck. I would suggest something like this:

class card_deck {
    protected $deck = NULL;

    public function __construct() {
        // some logic to create, shuffle, and set deck array to $this->deck
    }

    public function pick_card() {
        if($this->get_card_count() < 1) {
            throw new Exception('The deck is empty.');
        }
        return array_shift($this->deck);
    }

    public function get_card_count() {
        return count($this->deck);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! How do I access $deck once the class has been instantiated? – dwstein Feb 20 '13 at 2:35
    
@dwstein Personally, I would suggest adding a get_deck() method that would return $this->deck, however you could also just make $this->deck public and access the property directly. I personally prefer to limit access to properties from outside the class to be via getters/setters. I makes it easier to change get/set logic down the line if you don't have a bunch of places in code that directly access the property. – Mike Brant Feb 20 '13 at 16:36
    
thanks very much! – dwstein Feb 21 '13 at 1:10

You will have to return it as an array. You can use an associative array or you can use list to break the array back out in to variables like this:

list($card, $deck) = $test_1->pick_card($play_deck);

public function pick_card(&$deck)
{
    $card = $deck[0];
    echo "picked this card: " . $card . "<br />";
    array_splice($deck,0,0);
    return array($card, $deck);
}
share|improve this answer

since you've got an object you could also use $this

class card_deck {
  public $card;
  public $deck;
  public function pick_card(&$deck) {
    $this->card = $deck[0];
    $this->deck = $deck;
    echo "picked this card: " . $this->card . "<br />";
    array_splice($this->deck,0,0);
  }
}

$test_1 = new card_deck();
//set $play_deck 
$test_1->pick_card($play_deck);

// now use
$test_1->card;
$test_1->deck;
share|improve this answer

You can return the values you need in an associative array. I think you are familiar with arrays, as you use deck[0] in your pick_card function:

class Foo{
    public function pick_card(&$deck){
        $card = $deck[0];
        echo "picked this card: " . $card . "<br />";
        array_splice($deck,0,0);
        return array('card'=>$card,'deck'=>$deck);
    }
}
$test_1 = new Foo;
$deck = $test_1->pick_card($play_deck);
echo 'Card: '.$deck['card'].'<br>';
echo 'Deck: '.$deck['deck'];
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