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This is probably going to be a pretty basic question but I'm confused on how to implement something like this.

For a class I'm taking on C I need to take two arrays that can vary in length and compare their elements in a separate function. (This function only takes the arrays as parameters, not their sizes) Any element that is in both arrays I need to put into another array and return that array (NOTE: each array is like a set in that no elements repeat in the same array). I have looked into how I would implement this a little bit and here are some of the issues I'm running into.

  1. How do I know where the end of the array is?

    I think I saw that I might be able to do {0} as an element in the array for a null element. If this is true I don't know what I would compare this element to in order to check for null.

  2. I think I'm supposed to pass pointers to the first element of the array because I don't think C will let the values of an array be passed, but a little unsure.

    If I do pass the arrays as pointers, how can I access the arrays elements to get their data?

  3. When returning the array to the main function, how can I return the resulting function without the memory being cleared up?

    Should I make the resulting array global, or is there a better way of handling it?

Thanks in advance.

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If you're taking course of programming in C, I guess they provide or at least suggest you some materials that you should use for studying the basics. All your questions could be answered by any solid book covering the basics of C + you would learn much more than just answers to these few questions of yours. –  LihO Feb 19 '13 at 22:27
1  
Without their sizing limits or a sentinel terminator (which you elude to with your comment on {0}) what you're asking is not possible. The rest is covered in any basic C book, and about ten thousand questions/answer on this site. –  WhozCraig Feb 19 '13 at 22:27
1  
"I don't know what I would compare this element to in order to check for null." Maybe you could compare it... to NULL? :) Also, I agree with LihO. This is pretty basic stuff, you should get a book. It'll answer your question and much more. –  netcoder Feb 19 '13 at 22:29
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your question is a bit vague. It looks like you want to implement set intersection where you have two sets, represented by arrays, and the output is another array implemented as an array.

1. How do I know where the end of the array is?

In C, there is no way to tell. If you cannot pass the length as a function then you will not be able to do a robust solution. It will need to be something similar to #2.

2. I think I saw that I might be able to do {0} as an element in the array for a null element. If this is true I don't know what I would compare this element to in order to check for null.

You can add a null character, which is just the value 0. To check, you will need to compare to 0. I do not know what do each of your array elements consist of, but one thing to watch of for is that none of those value is allowed to be zero anymore since it is reserved as an end of array marker.

3. I think I'm supposed to pass pointers to the first element of the array because I don't think C will let the values of an array be passed, but a little unsure.

Yes. You will pass the pointed to first element, which in C is the array symbol.

int A[10]; // pass A

4. If I do pass the arrays as pointers, how can I access the arrays elements to get their data?

Say you passed pointer A, you can access the elements by simple indexing as A[i], to grab the element i.

5. When returning the array to the main function, how can I return the resulting function without the memory being cleared up?

In the function you are writing, you can malloc an array and pass a pointer to the array created by malloc. Malloce'd memory is not deleted when the function exits.

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Might add that passing the array as a param would also work without the scariness of dynamic memory allocation. –  Michael Dorgan Feb 19 '13 at 22:54
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How do I know where the end of the array is?

If you aren't passing the size of the array as a separate parameter (which you should be), then you'll have to use some sort of a sentinel value (the way C strings use a 0 after the last character in the string).

I think I'm supposed to pass pointers to the first element of the array because I don't think C will let the values of an array be passed, but a little unsure.

C's array semantics are a little tricky. Except when it is the operand of the sizeof, _Alignof, or unary & operators, or is a string literal being used to initialize an array in a declaration, an expression of type "N-element array of T" will be converted to an expression of type "pointer to T", and the value of the expression will be the address of the first element in the array. So, given the code

int arr1[10];

foo(arr1); // equivalent to foo(&arr1[0]);

the expression arr1 in the call to foo will be converted from "10-element array of int" to "pointer to int", and the value received by foo is the address of the first element of the array:

void foo(int *a)
{
  // do stuff with a[i]
}

The expression a[i] is interpreted as *(a + i); we find the address of the i'th element following a and dereference the result.

This is a long-winded way of saying you'll use the [] operator on the arguments to your function as though they were regular arrays.

When returning the array to the main function, how can I return the resulting function without the memory being cleared up?

Not exactly clear what you mean here. Note that the following code won't work:

int *foo(int *a1, int *a2)
{
  int a3[SOME_SIZE];

  // copy elements from a1 and a2 to a3;

  return a3;
}

Once foo exits, the array a3 ceases to exist; that memory is reclaimed by the system, so the pointer value you return is no longer valid. You have three options:

First, you can pass the target array as a third argument:

int main(void)
{
  int arr1[N];
  int arr2[M];
  int arr3[K];
  ...
  foo(arr1, arr2, arr3);
  ...
}

void foo(int *a1, int *a2, int *result) { ... }

with the precondition that result points to an array large enough to hold all the elements you find (it should be as big as the larger of the two source arrays). If you don't want to mess with dynamic memory management, this is the way to go.

Secondly, you can allocate the target array dynamically in the function:

int main(void)
{
  int a1[M];
  int a2[N];
  int *a3;
  ...
  a3 = foo(a1, a2);
  ...
  free(a3);
}

int *foo(int *a1, int *a2)
{
  int *result = malloc(sizeof *result * SOME_SIZE);
  ...
  if (element_in_both_arrays())
    result[n++] = element_from_both_arrays();
  ...
  return result;
}

You'll have to remember to deallocate the memory once you're done with it.

Finally, you can declare the target array as a global variable (i.e., at file scope). I'm not going to present an example, because you don't want to do that.

Anytime you're passing arrays to functions or returning dynamically allocated buffers, you really need to pass array sizes as separate parameters. In general, it's impossible to determine how many elements are in an array based on a pointer value alone. You can use sentinel values, but they only tell you the logical size of an array, not its physical size. For example:

char buffer[1024] = "foo";

The logical size of buffer is 3 (the length of the string), but its physical size is 1 kilobyte.

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  1. To know the length of the array, you'll need to either pass the length as an argument, or you'll need to have a special value in the array that signifies it is the last item.

  2. If you pass an array, you are passing a pointer to the array. If this isn't clear, perhaps you should've included some code.

  3. If you pass an array to the function, then any changes made to the array will be visible to the calling method. There is no need to return anything.

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For 1: The caller of the function should know the length of each array. Allow this information to be passed into the function. You can optionally use a sentinel value to indicate the end of valid elements, but you have to make sure all users of the function are aware of this convention and follow it.

For 2: An array name will degrade to a pointer type with the value of the address of the first element of the array (in most cases). Nothing special needs to be done for this to happen.

For 3: You can have the caller provide a pointer to memory into which the output is copied. Alternatively, an array can be dynamically allocated by the function, but then the caller would need to know to free this memory.

/* Finds elements common to both a and b, and copies them to c. The c out
   parameter is assumed to be at least as large as the smaller of the a_sz
   and b_sz. Returns the number of elements copied into c. */
int find_in_common (const int *a, size_t a_sz, const int *b, size_t b_sz,
                    int *c)
{
    /* ... */
}
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