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wondered what's the best way to detect the finish of page loading/bootstrapping, when all directives done compiling/linking

any event already there? should i overload the bootstrap function?

thanks for any ideas Lior

share|improve this question

12 Answers 12

Just a hunch: why not look at how the ngCloak directive does it? Clearly the ngCloak directive manages to show content after things have loaded. I bet looking at ngCloak will lead to the exact answer...

EDIT 1 hour later: Ok, well, I looked at ngCloak and it's really short. What this obviously implies is that the compile function won't get executed until {{template}} expressions have been evaluated (i.e. the template it loaded), thus the nice functionality of the ngCloak directive.

My educated guess would be to just make a directive with the same simplicity of ngCloak, then in your compile function do whatever you want to do. :) Place the directive on the root element of your app. You can call the directive something like myOnload and use it as an attribute my-onload. The compile function will execute once the template has been compiled (expressions evaluated and sub-templates loaded).

EDIT, 23 hours later: Ok, so I did some research, and I also asked my own question. The question I asked was indirectly related to this question, but it coincidentally lead me to the answer that solves this question.

The answer is that you can create a simple directive and put your code in the directive's link function, which (for most use cases, explained below) will run when your element is ready/loaded. Based on Josh's description of the order in which compile and link functions are executed,

if you have this markup:

<div directive1>
  <div directive2>
    <!-- ... -->
  </div>
</div>

Then AngularJS will create the directives by running directive functions in a certain order:

directive1: compile
  directive2: compile
directive1: controller
directive1: pre-link
  directive2: controller
  directive2: pre-link
  directive2: post-link
directive1: post-link

By default a straight "link" function is a post-link, so your outer directive1's link function will not run until after the inner directive2's link function has ran. That's why we say that it's only safe to do DOM manipulation in the post-link. So toward the original question, there should be no issue accessing the child directive's inner html from the outer directive's link function, though dynamically inserted contents must be compiled, as said above.

From this we can conclude that we can simply make a directive to execute our code when everything is ready/compiled/linked/loaded:

    app.directive('ngElementReady', [function() {
        return {
            priority: -1000, // a low number so this directive loads after all other directives have loaded. 
            restrict: "A", // attribute only
            link: function($scope, $element, $attributes) {
                console.log(" -- Element ready!");
                // do what you want here.
            }
        };
    }]);

Now what you can do is put the ngElementReady directive onto the root element of the app, and the console.log will fire when it's loaded:

<body data-ng-app="MyApp" data-ng-element-ready="">
   ...
   ...
</body>

It's that simple! Just make a simple directive and use it. ;)

You can further customize it so it can execute an expression (i.e. a function) by adding $scope.$eval($attributes.ngElementReady); to it:

    app.directive('ngElementReady', [function() {
        return {
            priority: Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER, // execute last, after all other directives if any.
            restrict: "A",
            link: function($scope, $element, $attributes) {
                $scope.$eval($attributes.ngElementReady); // execute the expression in the attribute.
            }
        };
    }]);

Then you can use it on any element:

<body data-ng-app="MyApp" data-ng-controller="BodyCtrl" data-ng-element-ready="bodyIsReady()">
    ...
    <div data-ng-element-ready="divIsReady()">...<div>
</body>

Just make sure you have your functions (e.g. bodyIsReady and divIsReady) defined in the scope (in the controller) that your element lives under.

Caveats: I said this will work for most cases. Be careful when using certain directives like ngRepeat and ngIf. They create their own scope, and your directive may not fire. For example if you put our new ngElementReady directive on an element that also has ngIf, and the condition of the ngIf evaluates to false, then our ngElementReady directive won't get loaded. Or, for example, if you put our new ngElementReady directive on an element that also has a ngInclude directive, our directive won't be loaded if the template for the ngInclude does not exist. You can get around some of these problems by making sure you nest the directives instead of putting them all on the same element. For example, by doing this:

<div data-ng-element-ready="divIsReady()">
    <div data-ng-include="non-existent-template.html"></div>
<div>

instead of this:

<div data-ng-element-ready="divIsReady()" data-ng-include="non-existent-template.html"></div>

The ngElementReady directive will be compiled in the latter example, but it's link function will not be executed. Note: directives are always compiled, but their link functions are not always executed depending on certain scenarios like the above.

EDIT, a few minutes later:

Oh, and to fully answer the question, you can now $emit or $broadcast your event from the expression or function that is executed in the ng-element-ready attribute. :) E.g.:

<div data-ng-element-ready="$emit('someEvent')">
    ...
<div>

EDIT, even more few minutes later:

@satchmorun's answer works too, but only for the initial load. Here's a very useful SO question that describes the order things are executed including link functions, app.run, and others. So, depending on your use case, app.run might be good, but not for specific elements, in which case link functions are better.

EDIT, five months later, Oct 17 at 8:11 PST:

This doesn't work with partials that are loaded asynchronously. You'll need to add bookkeeping into your partials (e.g. one way is to make each partial keep track of when its content is done loading then emit an event so the parent scope can count how many partials have loaded and finally do what it needs to do after all partials are loaded).

EDIT, Oct 23 at 10:52pm PST:

I made a simple directive for firing some code when an image is loaded:

/*
 * This img directive makes it so that if you put a loaded="" attribute on any
 * img element in your app, the expression of that attribute will be evaluated
 * after the images has finished loading. Use this to, for example, remove
 * loading animations after images have finished loading.
 */
  app.directive('img', function() {
    return {
      restrict: 'E',
      link: function($scope, $element, $attributes) {
        $element.bind('load', function() {
          if ($attributes.loaded) {
            $scope.$eval($attributes.loaded);
          }
        });
      }
    };
  });

EDIT, Oct 24 at 12:48am PST:

I improved my original ngElementReady directive and renamed it to whenReady.

/*
 * The whenReady directive allows you to execute the content of a when-ready
 * attribute after the element is ready (i.e. done loading all sub directives and DOM
 * content except for things that load asynchronously like partials and images).
 *
 * Execute multiple expressions by delimiting them with a semi-colon. If there
 * is more than one expression, and the last expression evaluates to true, then
 * all expressions prior will be evaluated after all text nodes in the element
 * have been interpolated (i.e. {{placeholders}} replaced with actual values). 
 *
 * Caveats: if other directives exists on the same element as this directive
 * and destroy the element thus preventing other directives from loading, using
 * this directive won't work. The optimal way to use this is to put this
 * directive on an outer element.
 */
app.directive('whenReady', ['$interpolate', function($interpolate) {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    priority: Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER, // execute last, after all other directives if any.
    link: function($scope, $element, $attributes) {
      var expressions = $attributes.whenReady.split(';');
      var waitForInterpolation = false;

      function evalExpressions(expressions) {
        expressions.forEach(function(expression) {
          $scope.$eval(expression);
        });
      }

      if ($attributes.whenReady.trim().length == 0) { return; }

      if (expressions.length > 1) {
        if ($scope.$eval(expressions.pop())) {
          waitForInterpolation = true;
        }
      }

      if (waitForInterpolation) {
        requestAnimationFrame(function checkIfInterpolated() {
          if ($element.text().indexOf($interpolate.startSymbol()) >= 0) { // if the text still has {{placeholders}}
            requestAnimationFrame(checkIfInterpolated);
          }
          else {
            evalExpressions(expressions);
          }
        });
      }
      else {
        evalExpressions(expressions);
      }
    }
  }
}]);

For example, use it like this to fire someFunction when an element is loaded and {{placeholders}} not yet replaced:

<div when-ready="someFunction()">
  <span ng-repeat="item in items">{{item.property}}</span>
</div>

someFunction will be called before all the item.property placeholders are replaced.

Evaluate as many expressions as you want, and make the last expression true to wait for {{placeholders}} to be evaluated like this:

<div when-ready="someFunction(); anotherFunction(); true">
  <span ng-repeat="item in items">{{item.property}}</span>
</div>

someFunction and anotherFunction will be fired after {{placeholders}} have been replaced.

This only works the first time an element is loaded, not on future changes. It may not work as desired if a $digest keeps happening after placeholders have initially been replaced (a $digest can happen up to 10 times until data stops changing). It'll be suitable for a vast majority of use cases.

EDIT, Oct 31 at 7:26pm PST:

Alright, this is probably my last and final update. This will probably work for 99.999 of the use cases out there:

/*
 * The whenReady directive allows you to execute the content of a when-ready
 * attribute after the element is ready (i.e. when it's done loading all sub directives and DOM
 * content). See: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/14968690/sending-event-when-angular-js-finished-loading
 *
 * Execute multiple expressions in the when-ready attribute by delimiting them
 * with a semi-colon. when-ready="doThis(); doThat()"
 *
 * Optional: If the value of a wait-for-interpolation attribute on the
 * element evaluates to true, then the expressions in when-ready will be
 * evaluated after all text nodes in the element have been interpolated (i.e.
 * {{placeholders}} have been replaced with actual values).
 *
 * Optional: Use a ready-check attribute to write an expression that
 * specifies what condition is true at any given moment in time when the
 * element is ready. The expression will be evaluated repeatedly until the
 * condition is finally true. The expression is executed with
 * requestAnimationFrame so that it fires at a moment when it is least likely
 * to block rendering of the page.
 *
 * If wait-for-interpolation and ready-check are both supplied, then the
 * when-ready expressions will fire after interpolation is done *and* after
 * the ready-check condition evaluates to true.
 *
 * Caveats: if other directives exists on the same element as this directive
 * and destroy the element thus preventing other directives from loading, using
 * this directive won't work. The optimal way to use this is to put this
 * directive on an outer element.
 */
app.directive('whenReady', ['$interpolate', function($interpolate) {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
    priority: Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER, // execute last, after all other directives if any.
    link: function($scope, $element, $attributes) {
      var expressions = $attributes.whenReady.split(';');
      var waitForInterpolation = false;
      var hasReadyCheckExpression = false;

      function evalExpressions(expressions) {
        expressions.forEach(function(expression) {
          $scope.$eval(expression);
        });
      }

      if ($attributes.whenReady.trim().length === 0) { return; }

    if ($attributes.waitForInterpolation && $scope.$eval($attributes.waitForInterpolation)) {
        waitForInterpolation = true;
    }

      if ($attributes.readyCheck) {
        hasReadyCheckExpression = true;
      }

      if (waitForInterpolation || hasReadyCheckExpression) {
        requestAnimationFrame(function checkIfReady() {
          var isInterpolated = false;
          var isReadyCheckTrue = false;

          if (waitForInterpolation && $element.text().indexOf($interpolate.startSymbol()) >= 0) { // if the text still has {{placeholders}}
            isInterpolated = false;
          }
          else {
            isInterpolated = true;
          }

          if (hasReadyCheckExpression && !$scope.$eval($attributes.readyCheck)) { // if the ready check expression returns false
            isReadyCheckTrue = false;
          }
          else {
            isReadyCheckTrue = true;
          }

          if (isInterpolated && isReadyCheckTrue) { evalExpressions(expressions); }
          else { requestAnimationFrame(checkIfReady); }

        });
      }
      else {
        evalExpressions(expressions);
      }
    }
  };
}]);

Use it like this

<div when-ready="isReady()" ready-check="checkIfReady()" wait-for-interpolation="true">
   isReady will fire when this {{placeholder}} has been evaluated
   and when checkIfReady finally returns true. checkIfReady might
   contain code like `$('.some-element').length`.
</div>

Of course, it can probably be optimized, but I'll just leave it at that. requestAnimationFrame is nice.

share|improve this answer
3  
Really annoying with all those "data-" prefixes. I am glad I do not use them myself. – stolsvik Jun 9 '14 at 12:33
1  
@stolsvik heh, yeah, in the most modern browsers they are not needed. – trusktr Jun 12 '14 at 9:14
23  
Deserves up vote for amount of time and effort put into this answer. Nice work! – GordyD Aug 15 '14 at 15:40
1  
@trusktr they are not needed in any browsers. It's a matter of forwar compability rather then backwards. I.e to ensure that in furure no attribute ng-*** after becoming HTML standart will not break your Angular app. Generally, those who don't use data- just assume that ng-*** will never be introduced into HTML as native attribute. – Max Yari Jul 2 '15 at 14:54
1  
Nice answer, but please consider removing all the "Edit" lines and restructuring your answer a bit. The edit history is available via the "edited ..." link at the bottom of your answer, and it distracts while reading. – Stijn Jan 11 at 11:34

In the docs for angular.Module, there's an entry describing the run function:

Use this method to register work which should be performed when the injector is done loading all modules.

So if you have some module that is your app:

var app = angular.module('app', [/* module dependencies */]);

You can run stuff after the modules have loaded with:

app.run(function() {
  // Do post-load initialization stuff here
});

EDIT: Manual Initialization to the rescue

So it's been pointed out that the run doesn't get called when the DOM is ready and linked up. It gets called when the $injector for the module referenced by ng-app has loaded all its dependencies, which is separate from the DOM compilation step.

I took another look at manual initialization, and it seems that this should do the trick.

I've made a fiddle to illustrate.

The HTML is simple:

<html>
    <body>
        <test-directive>This is a test</test-directive>
    </body>
</html>

Note the lack of an ng-app. And I have a directive that will do some DOM manipulation, so we can make sure of the order and timing of things.

As usual, a module is created:

var app = angular.module('app', []);

And here's the directive:

app.directive('testDirective', function() {
    return {
        restrict: 'E',
        template: '<div class="test-directive"><h1><div ng-transclude></div></h1></div>',
        replace: true,
        transclude: true,
        compile: function() {
            console.log("Compiling test-directive");
            return {
                pre: function() { console.log("Prelink"); },
                post: function() { console.log("Postlink"); }
            };
        }
    };
});

We're going to replace the test-directive tag with a div of class test-directive, and wrap its contents in an h1.

I've added a compile function that returns both pre and post link functions so we can see when these things run.

Here's the rest of the code:

// The bootstrapping process

var body = document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0];

// Check that our directive hasn't been compiled

function howmany(classname) {
    return document.getElementsByClassName(classname).length;
}

Before we've done anything, there should be no elements with a class of test-directive in the DOM, and after we're done there should be 1.

console.log('before (should be 0):', howmany('test-directive'));

angular.element(document).ready(function() {
    // Bootstrap the body, which loades the specified modules
    // and compiled the DOM.
    angular.bootstrap(body, ['app']);

    // Our app is loaded and the DOM is compiled
    console.log('after (should be 1):', howmany('test-directive'));
});

It's pretty straightforward. When the document is ready, call angular.bootstrap with the root element of your app and an array of module names.

In fact, if you attach a run function to the app module, you'll see it gets run before any of the compiling takes place.

If you run the fiddle and watch the console, you'll see the following:

before (should be 0): 0 
Compiling test-directive 
Prelink
Postlink
after (should be 1): 1 <--- success!
share|improve this answer
1  
thanks @satchmorun! but run() executes before the end of the linking part - just verified it with some console.logs. – Lior Feb 19 '13 at 22:51
    
was curious myself... I have a directive that fires to implement some jQuery DOM plugins, run fires before the directive and when run fires, html is not all there – charlietfl Feb 19 '13 at 22:56
    
@charlietfl - I dug a little bit into manual bootstrapping, and it's actually a pretty easy way to get what the question is looking for. I've adding a pretty lengthy edit to my original answer. – satchmorun Feb 20 '13 at 0:27
5  
i found that using $timeout( initMyPlugins,0) works within my directive, all the html I need is there – charlietfl Feb 20 '13 at 0:53
    
this works - thanks! – Lior Feb 20 '13 at 19:40

I have come up with a solution that is relatively accurate at evaluating when the angular initialisation is complete.

The directive is:

.directive('initialisation',['$rootScope',function($rootScope) {
            return {
                restrict: 'A',
                link: function($scope) {
                    var to;
                    var listener = $scope.$watch(function() {
                        clearTimeout(to);
                        to = setTimeout(function () {
                            console.log('initialised');
                            listener();
                            $rootScope.$broadcast('initialised');
                        }, 50);
                    });
                }
            };
        }]);

That can then just be added as an attribute to the body element and then listened for using $scope.$on('initialised', fn)

It works by assuming that the application is initialised when there are no more $digest cycles. $watch is called every digest cycle and so a timer is started (setTimeout not $timeout so a new digest cycle is not triggered). If a digest cycle does not occur within the timeout then the application is assumed to have initialised.

It is obviously not as accurate as satchmoruns solution (as it is possible a digest cycle takes longer than the timeout) but my solution doesn't need you to keep track of the modules which makes it that much easier to manage (particularly for larger projects). Anyway, seems to be accurate enough for my requirements. Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent solution. For projects when all code in one or two compressed files works very well. – merqlove Sep 8 '14 at 21:36
    
This is fantastic solution.In case you have lots of code in jquery and you are trying to convert the code to angular step by step this makes perfect sense. – Mangesh Pimpalkar Dec 25 '14 at 23:07
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Wanted to add one more realization I had about my own question: Angular hasnt provided a way to signal when a page finished loading, maybe because 'finished' depends on your application. for example, if you have hierarchical tree of partials, one loading the others. 'finish' would mean that all of them have been loaded. Any framework would have a hard time analyzing your code and understanding that everything is done, or still waited upon.For that, you would have to provide application-specific logic to check and determine that.

thanks

Lior

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If you are using Angular UI Router, you can listen for the $viewContentLoadedevent.

"$viewContentLoaded - fired once the view is loaded, after the DOM is rendered. The '$scope' of the view emits the event." - Link

$scope.$on('$viewContentLoaded', 
function(event){ ... });
share|improve this answer
3  
$scope.$watch('$viewContentLoaded', function() made the trick for me – Louis XIV May 20 '15 at 12:29
1  
downvoted for the 'which you should be'. What if I said "if you're using React instead of Angular (which you should be)..." ? Not a very attitude to have in this ecosystem IMHO. – Valentin Waeselynck Feb 9 at 15:34
    
@ValentinWaeselynck you are absolutely right. I edited my answer to remove my bias. – Jordan Skole Feb 10 at 18:25
    
Worked for me! Thank you. I actually added it to my run function, then changed $scope to $rootScope. – Josh Davies May 26 at 8:32

i observe DOM manipulation of angular with JQuery and i did set a finish for my app (some sort of predefined and satisfactory situation that i need for my app-abstract) for example i expect my ng-repeater to produce 7 result and there for i will set an observation function with the help of setInterval for this purpose .

$(document).ready(function(){

  var interval = setInterval(function(){

  if($("article").size() == 7){
     myFunction();
     clearInterval(interval);
  }

  },50);

});
share|improve this answer
3  
I would not do this. Using intervals to check for stuff happening is not good practice, unscalable, and there are other ways to make things happen. Timers are for doing concrete tasks that need to happen after a certain time period, not for "guessing" when content or results are ready. – dudewad Dec 5 '14 at 19:21
    
Not to mention that using a jquery timer against the angular platform is counter-productive- angular has a timeout class and you should use that otherwise you're straddling two frameworks and it becomes confusing very quickly. – dudewad Dec 5 '14 at 19:22

According to the Angular team and this Github issue:

we now have $viewContentLoaded and $includeContentLoaded events that are emitted in ng-view and ng-include respectively. I think this is as close as one can get to knowing when we are done with the compilation.

Based on this, it seems this is currently not possible to do in a reliable way, otherwise Angular would have provided the event out of the box.

Bootstrapping the app implies running the digest cycle on the root scope, and there is also not a digest cycle finished event.

According to the Angular 2 design docs:

Because of multiple digests, it is impossible to determine and notify the component that the model is stable. This is because notification can further change data, which can restart the binding process.

According to this, the fact that this is not possible is one the reasons why the decision was taken to go for a rewrite in Angular 2.

share|improve this answer

If you don't use ngRoute module, i.e. you don't have $viewContentLoaded event.

You can use another directive method:

    angular.module('someModule')
        .directive('someDirective', someDirective);

    someDirective.$inject = ['$rootScope', '$timeout']; //Inject services

    function someDirective($rootScope, $timeout){
        return {
            restrict: "A",
            priority: Number.MIN_SAFE_INTEGER, //Lowest priority
            link    : function(scope, element, attr){
                $timeout(
                    function(){
                        $rootScope.$emit("Some:event");
                    }
                );
            }
        };
    }

Accordingly to trusktr's answer it has lowest priority. Plus $timeout will cause Angular to run through an entire event loop before callback execution.

$rootScope used, because it allow to place directive in any scope of the application and notify only necessary listeners.

$rootScope.$emit will fire an event for all $rootScope.$on listeners only. The interesting part is that $rootScope.$broadcast will notify all $rootScope.$on as well as $scope.$on listeners Source

share|improve this answer

I had a fragment that was getting loaded-in after/by the main partial that came in via routing.

I needed to run a function after that subpartial loaded and I didn't want to write a new directive and figured out you could use a cheeky ngIf

Controller of parent partial:

$scope.subIsLoaded = function() { /*do stuff*/; return true; };

HTML of subpartial

<element ng-if="subIsLoaded()"><!-- more html --></element>
share|improve this answer

These are all great solutions, However, if you are currently using Routing then I found this solution to be the easiest and least amount of code needed. Using the 'resolve' property to wait for a promise to complete before triggering the route. e.g.

$routeProvider
.when("/news", {
    templateUrl: "newsView.html",
    controller: "newsController",
    resolve: {
        message: function(messageService){
            return messageService.getMessage();
    }
}

})

Click here for the full docs - Credit to K. Scott Allen

share|improve this answer
    
It will work only for the particular url. – Eduard Dec 4 '15 at 11:29

may be i can help you by this example

In the custom fancybox I show contents with interpolated values.

in the service, in the "open" fancybox method, i do

open: function(html, $compile) {
        var el = angular.element(html);
     var compiledEl = $compile(el);
        $.fancybox.open(el); 
      }

the $compile returns compiled data. you can check the compiled data

share|improve this answer

If you want to generate JS with server-side data (JSP, PHP) you could add your logic to a service, that will be loaded automatically when your controller is loaded.

Additionally, if you want to react when all directives are done compiling/linking, you could add the appropriate proposed solutions above in the initialization logic.

module.factory('YourControllerInitService', function() {

    // add your initialization logic here

    // return empty service, because it will not be used
    return {};
});


module.controller('YourController', function (YourControllerInitService) {
});
share|improve this answer

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