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I'm trying to return entities where the bool "isAssy" is true:

 public ObservableCollection<MasterPartsList> ParentAssemblyBOM
 {
      get {return this._parentAssemblyBOM.Where(parent => parent.isAssy == true); }
 }

but the entire statement is underlined in red stating that I cannot "convert type IEnumerable to ObservableCollection...are you missing a cast?"

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

ObservableCollection<T> has an overloaded constructor that accepts an IEnumerable<T> as a parameter. Assuming that your Linq statement returns a collection of MasterPartsList items:

public ObservableCollection<MasterPartsList> ParentAssemblyBOM
{
    get 
    {
        var enumerable = this._parentAssemblyBOM
                             .Where(parent => parent.isAssy == true);

        return new ObservableCollection<MasterPartsList>(enumerable); 
    }
}
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Thank you! I can't believe I missed that. Great explanation. – Rachael Feb 19 '13 at 23:06

You have to explicitly create the ObservableCollection which at it's most simplest is:

public ObservableCollection<MasterPartsList> ParentAssemblyBOM
{
    get {return new ObservableCollection<MasterPartsList>(this._parentAssemblyBOM.Where(parent => parent.isAssy == true)); }
}

This is potentially inefficient as you are creating new collection every time. However, this might be the simplest solution if you are returning a radically different set of data each time. Otherwise you have to loop through the collection removing items that are no longer in the return set and adding new items.

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I wasn't aware. What is my alternative? Thanks! – Rachael Feb 19 '13 at 22:51
    
@UB3571 - I'm just checking but it depends on your usage. – ChrisF Feb 19 '13 at 22:54
    
It might be worth the overhead if the collection really does have to be an Observable one. – Robert Harvey Feb 19 '13 at 22:55
    
I believe the collection must be Observable. I'm binding to the collection in a ListBox and the properties of each item in the collection must be fully exposed/implement INotifyPropertyChanged – Rachael Feb 19 '13 at 23:09

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