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So this code:

int usedPermits = totalPermits - semaphore.availablePermits();
semaphore.release(usedPermits);

Isn't threadsafe, because if between the two lines another thread releases a permit, semaphore's capacity will actually increase above its original maximum.

This works in my situation since this strip of code is 1) single-threaded and 2) the only place from which permits are released, which may simply illustrate the fact that "release all" and "acquire/release" are two incompatible design patterns on the same object.

However, I want to ask if there is preferred pattern with a less subtle thread synchronization policy.

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What do you need this piece of code for? –  didierc Feb 19 '13 at 23:34
    
@didierc A throttler - activity can happen at most N times every M minutes, then the permits fully replenish. –  djechlin Feb 20 '13 at 0:19
    
why don't the activities themselves release the permits? –  jtahlborn Feb 20 '13 at 2:07
    
@jtahlborn That may be a better algorithm - per James' answer below yes, this one does rate limit rather kludgily. –  djechlin Feb 20 '13 at 2:09
1  
it is a better algorithm. With the current solution, you are creating new permits, rather than letting them flow naturally back and forth between the semaphore (which act as a permit store) and the threads. –  didierc Feb 20 '13 at 13:20
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As explained in other answers, there is a solution to make your piece of code atomic. However, there is no guarantee that it will solve the problem, in a general setting, simply because this code cannot be correct in all situations.

Either permits are released by activities using them, in which case that code is superfluous: the semaphore will be replenished naturally, or they don't, in which case you will need that piece of code, and it will be safe, as long as you don't do anything weird with it.

Note that you state that you wish to limit the rate of activities per time quantum (here a minute), but you must take in account that activities may last longer than an minute. There are really two different things that you can limit here:

  • the number of activities starting per quantum,
  • the number of activities running in a quantum

If you wish to limit the first, then you will need your code to refill the permits, and let activites keep their permits. If you want to handle the second case, then you must force activities to acquire and release their permit when starting and terminating respectively.

If you are afraid about a misuse of the semaphore by some activities, just forbid its use in the activity code itself. Indeed, the rate limiting is completely orthogonal to the activity semantics, and it's better to separate that functionality from the activity main code. Therefore you should wrap any scheduled activity with the code to handle the semaphore:

class RateLimitedRunnable implements Runnable {
    Runnable runnable;
    RateLimitedRunnable(Runnable r) { runnable = r; }
    void Run() {
        semaphore.acquire();
        runnable.run();
        semaphore.release(); // remove if only limiting starts
    }
}

The sample (untested) code above describe a possible handling of the use of semaphore away from the real activity, thus removing any potential misuse. If the inner activity needs to access the semaphore, it should only be to retrieve its current state, and an ad-hoc interface can surely be designed to provide that limited access.

Note: I use the "activity" term here as a mean for threads or processes, since the discussion on uses of semaphores is more general than the context of Java.

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+1 for demonstrating why this design is impossible. –  djechlin Mar 7 '13 at 3:33
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Kludging something onto Semaphore is a bit odd, if it's even doable. It's also going to cause burstiness - if you're limiting to 10k QPS, every second, you're going to reset and get 10000 queries at once. Why not use an existing RateLimiter implementation?:

http://docs.guava-libraries.googlecode.com/git/javadoc/com/google/common/util/concurrent/RateLimiter.html

Or take a peek at the code for inspiration, at the least:

http://code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/source/browse/guava/src/com/google/common/util/concurrent/RateLimiter.java?name=v13.0-rc2

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Isn't threadsafe, because if between the two lines another thread releases a permit, semaphore's capacity will actually increase above its original maximum.

This should be solved by synchronization, also enforce that every semaphore.release() to be in a synchronized block, e.g.

synchronize(lock) {
    int usedPermits = totalPermits - semaphore.availablePermits();
    semaphore.release(usedPermits);
}

However, this might not be enough if you want to ensure that number of permits does not exceed the totalPermits because even with the synchronized release all block, if a thread called release afterwords the semaphore will exceed totalPermits.

You might implement a function that threads call to release permits without calling semaphore.release() directly, e.g.

void limitedRelease(){
  synchronize(lock) {
    if(semaphore.availablePermits() < totalPermits ) {
      semaphore.release();
    }    
  }  
}
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I think the first part of your question is simply incorrect: adding synchronized for semaphore is not going to solve the very first problem. Please note that all method in Semaphore is not synchorized, that means, even you are synchronizing the semaphore instance, you are not blocking other release() during the execution of synchronized block. Synchronizing every access to semaphore as suggested in your last part will solve the problem. However imho, it is really weird to synchronize on a semaphore... :P It is better to handcraft a semaphore-like obj (it is simple), using synchronized –  Adrian Shum Feb 20 '13 at 1:56
    
This still isn't threadsafe. You're making the assumption that Semaphore does synchronize(this) or equivalent. It doesn't say that it does, and in fact delegates to a Sync object to provide fair and non-fair access, at least in OpenJDK: grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/root/jdk/openjdk/… –  James Feb 20 '13 at 1:57
    
I gave it another thought, and I agree it is more natural to synchronized on a common object. But still I do not see there is any assumptions that Semaphore functions are synchronized. –  iTech Feb 20 '13 at 2:07
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Why don't you extend the standard Semaphore class and override its methods, but make them synchronized:

public class Semaphore extends java.util.concurrent.Semaphore {
public Semaphore(int permits)
{
    super(permits);
}

public synchronized void releaseAll()
{
    super.release(super.drainPermits());
}   
}
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The point is to avoid synchronization. –  djechlin Sep 3 '13 at 18:04
    
agree, that a bad solution –  il4.serg Sep 4 '13 at 9:58
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