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The second part of translation phase 2 (section 2.2.2 in N3485) basically says that if a source file does not end in a newline character, the compiler should treat it as if it did.

However, if I'm reading it correctly it makes an explicit exception for empty source files, which remain empty.

The exact text (with added emphasis) is:

Each instance of a backslash character (\) immediately followed by a new-line character is deleted, splicing physical source lines to form logical source lines. Only the last backslash on any physical source line shall be eligible for being part of such a splice. If, as a result, a character sequence that matches the syntax of a universal-character-name is produced, the behavior is undefined. A source file that is not empty and that does not end in a new-line character, or that ends in a new-line character immediately preceded by a backslash character before any such splicing takes place, shall be processed as if an additional new-line character were appended to the file.

I haven't been able to figure out any situations in which it would make a difference whether a source file was empty or consisted of only a newline character.

I'm hoping someone can shed some light on the reasoning behind this requirement.

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I edited your post to reference the correct section (2.2.2) and include the actual text for easier reading. Please note that the document you reference isn't the final, approved standard but a draft, not that it matters in this instance. –  Nik Bougalis Feb 20 '13 at 0:00
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Alright, I'm stumped. –  Mooing Duck Feb 20 '13 at 0:07
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Productivity metrics? –  Romain Hippeau Feb 20 '13 at 0:09
    
@NikBougalis, thanks, and noted. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Feb 20 '13 at 1:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the idea is that a source file normally consists of zero or more lines, and each line consists of a sequence of non-new-line characters followed by a new-line. Any source file not meeting that requirement needs special handling (so you don't get lines composed of text from two different source files).

An empty C++ source file is not particularly useful, but there's no point in forbidding it. The quoted clause isn't about distinguishing between an empty file and a file consisting of just one new-line (there should be no real difference between them).

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I agree. The text says that implementers can process backslash-newline and #include in any order, but the outcome should be the same - even if in the presence of empty files and files consisting of only a single backslash. –  edgar.holleis Feb 20 '13 at 17:45

This is to specifically support the 1994 winning entry in the international obfuscated C code contest in the category "worst abuse of rules": The world's smallest self-replicating program. Guaranteed.

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Doubtful, since that source file should no longer result in an executable. –  Keith Thompson Feb 20 '13 at 0:58
    
It might be valid in a freestanding implementation, maybe, since "A program shall contain a global function called main, which is the designated start of the program. It is implementation-defined whether a program in a freestanding environment is required to define a main function." –  Samuel Edwin Ward Feb 20 '13 at 1:10
    
Try gcc -Wl,--defsym=_start=_exit -Wl,--undefined=_exit -nostartfiles -static -o zero zero.c –  edgar.holleis Feb 20 '13 at 15:22

The preprocessor can be used to construct things besides program source, and a blank line can be significant -- it's often used to separate paragraphs in text, for instance.

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i guess this means that every line ends with \n, while empty file has no lines

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How do you define a "line"? –  WiSaGaN Feb 20 '13 at 0:38
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@WiSaGaN: One reasonable definition is "a sequence of zero or more non-newline characters followed by a single newline". Then if a file consists of zero or more lines, every non-empty file ends in a newline. –  Keith Thompson Feb 20 '13 at 1:38

"A source file that is not empty and that does not end in a new-line character, or that ends in a new-line character immediately preceded by a backslash character before any such splicing takes place, shall be processed as if an additional new-line character were appended to the file."

The second part of translation phase 2 (section 2.2.2 in N3485) basically says that if a source file does not end in a newline character, the compiler should treat it as if it did.

No - it says that if the file "is not empty" AND does not end in a newline, then a newline is added

However, if I'm reading it correctly it makes an explicit exception for empty source files, which remain empty.

Agreed.

I haven't been able to figure out any situations in which it would make a difference whether a source file was empty or consisted of only a newline character. I'm hoping someone can shed some light on the reasoning behind this requirement.

Consider a header file called "header.h" with last line as below with no trailing newline:

#endif  // #ifndef INCLUDED_HEADER_H

Say another.cc includes it as follows:

#include "header.h"
#include "another.h"

When another.cc is parsed, the text from header.h is substituted for the line specifying its inclusion. Done naively, that would result in:

#endif  // #ifndef INCLUDED_HEADER_H#include "another.h"

Obvious, the compiler would then fail to act on #include "another.h", considering it part of the comment begun in header.h.

So, the rule for incomplete rules avoids these problems (which could be terribly hard to spot).

If the file was empty anyway, this problem doesn't manifest: there's nothing like the #endif to be prepended to the next line in the including file....

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This header file might violate the rule (a couple sentences later) that "A source file shall not end in a partial preprocessing token or in a partial com- ment." The way I'm looking at it, this sort of thing explains why you would want to add a newline to a file that doesn't end in one, but not why an empty file should be treated differently than any other file that doesn't end in a newline. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Feb 20 '13 at 14:55
    
@SamuelEdwinWard: "// xxx" is not a partial comment precisely because the processing stages add a newline. A partial comment is of the form "... /* ...". "[doesn't explain] why an empty file should be treated differently"... my last paragraph explains that - maybe putting it another way will help: an empty file doesn't risk prepending any content to the next line of the translation unit the way a file with an unfinished line does.... –  Tony D Feb 21 '13 at 2:32

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