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I try to extract text between parapgraph tag using RegExp in javascript. But it doen't work...

My pattern:

<p>(.*?)</p>

Subject:

<p> My content. </p> <img src="https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTJ9ylGJ4SDyl49VGh9Q9an2vruuMip-VIIEG38DgGM3GvxEi_H"> <p> Second sentence. </p>

Result :

My content

What I want:

My content. Second sentence.
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3  
Don't parse HTML with RegEx –  gilly3 Feb 19 '13 at 23:51
    
You can get the body of <p> tags just fine with regex (despite the warnings against parsing generally with it), but if you're using JavaScript there's no need to since you have document.getElementsByTagName("p"). –  iamnotmaynard Feb 19 '13 at 23:58
    
@iamnotmaynard - document.getElementsByTagName() is a DOM method. It is only available to JavaScript because the browser provides it. With node.js, there is no browser, and node.js does not natively parse HTML into a DOM. You can't assume that, just because you are using the JavaScript language, a browser DOM is available. A DOM can be made available to node.js if such a package is installed, such as jsdom. –  gilly3 Feb 20 '13 at 0:06
    
@gilly3 Ah, I see. Was not aware of that. –  iamnotmaynard Feb 20 '13 at 0:07
    
@gilly3, hoh no... Not that easy generic answer again -_-. Using regex for what he wants is perfectly fine. –  Jean-Philippe Leclerc Feb 20 '13 at 0:45
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no "capture all group matches" (analogous to PHP's preg_match_all) in JavaScript, but you can cheat by using .replace:

var matches = [];
html.replace(/<p>(.*?)<\/p>/g, function () {
    //arguments[0] is the entire match
    matches.push(arguments[1]);
});
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Ok so, how can I do using Jade and NodeJS for extract the text between <p> and </p>? –  tonymx227 Feb 19 '13 at 23:57
    
@tonymx227 I don't really know what you mean .. that code is just raw JavaScript, so you should be able to use it with any JS interpreter –  Explosion Pills Feb 19 '13 at 23:58
    
Yes I know. But with controller I send to my Jade view (for example) all the posts, with my view I try to get the content of a post without tag... ${posts.content.match('/<p>(.*?)<\/p>/g')} but it doesn't work... –  tonymx227 Feb 20 '13 at 0:05
    
I don't know how to use Jade views, so I wouldn't really be able to help you there. I said to use .replace, not match, though –  Explosion Pills Feb 20 '13 at 0:07
    
I asked a new question because it's not the same subject. But thank you anyway. –  tonymx227 Feb 20 '13 at 0:19
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To get more than one match of a pattern the global flag g is added.
The match method ignores capture groups () when matching globally, but the exec method does not. See MDN exec.

var m,
    rex = /<p>(.*?)<\/p>/g,
    str = '<p> My content. </p> <img src="https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTJ9ylGJ4SDyl49VGh9Q9an2vruuMip-VIIEG38DgGM3GvxEi_H"> <p> Second sentence. </p>';

while ( ( m = rex.exec( str ) ) != null ) {
    console.log( m[1] );
}

//  My content. 
//  Second sentence. 

If there may be newlines between the paragraphs, use [\s\S], meaning match any space or non-space character, instead of ..

Note that this kind of regex will fail on nested paragraphs as it will match up to the first closing tag.

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There's no such thing as "nested paragraphs". A <p> does not require a closing tag. A block element that occurs after an open <p> tag implies a closing </p> tag. Your regexp will treat multiple paragraphs without closing tags as one single paragraph. –  gilly3 Mar 7 '13 at 23:38
    
@gilly3. XHTML requires the closing tag and I think the OP makes it quite clear in his question he is looking for the content between opening and closing p tags. It is pretty obvious my answer assumes the closing tags and if there isn't any the OP's regex (not mine) won't match anyway. Nevertheless, I think your observation is worthwhile, so thank you. –  MikeM Mar 7 '13 at 23:59
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