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Suppose you wanted to implement a templated function that takes two iterators to a container and an integer that describes "if an element in the container is in the container fewer than < integer> times, then pop it from the container." Such a declaration could be:

template <class theIter>
theIter pop_um(theIter start, theIter end, int fewerThan);

Is it possible to write such a function in O(n) time? What procedures are commonly used to execute such a task?

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Any code written to attempt to do this yet? No offense, but this looks like a homework problem cut and paste. –  Michael Dorgan Feb 20 '13 at 0:38
    
I got the problem from a textbook (as recommended), so it's not particularly homework. I'm confused how the removal can be done in O(n); that is, how can we quickly determine which elements appear fewer than the number of times? –  Bob John Feb 20 '13 at 0:42
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What if I have a vector like (2,3,2,4,4,5,5,5,5,6,7,4) and I want to remove all elements that appear fewer than 3 times (that is, remove 2, 3, 6, and 7). If I just go from start to end, how can I know that 2, for example, only appears twice when I come upon the first instance of it (without iterating through the entire container)? –  Bob John Feb 20 '13 at 0:48
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Better Solution - scan the array and keep a running count of each element in a structure. When done, run through your count array and remove elements that appear more than "less_than" times. This would run O(2n * (num matches)) time which will vary between linear and quadratic depending on num_matches. The problem here is while accessing your count array could be done constant time, the rescan for your counts will not. Also, a stack/list style solution will not help as you have to rescan it every iteration for previous matches. –  Michael Dorgan Feb 20 '13 at 0:58
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Bucket/radix sort your data to start in linear time. Then scan your new sorted list in linear time keeping track of when the elements change and making it easy to pop. Linear time. –  Michael Dorgan Feb 20 '13 at 1:01

1 Answer 1

Bucket/radix sort your data (from start to end iterators) to start in linear time. Then scan your new sorted list in linear time keeping track of when the elements change and making it easy to pop. Linear time. O(2n) = O(n). Takes a lot of RAM for the buckets though depending on how you sort.

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Doesn't bucket sort have time complexity O(n^2)? –  Bob John Feb 20 '13 at 1:51
    
Also note that this doesn't have to contain integers. It can contain words, for example. –  Bob John Feb 20 '13 at 1:59
    
Radix sort can also work for words in linear time, just not quite as fast a linear time. And bucket sort worst case os O(n^2), while a radix sort is linear. They are both very similiar in my mind which is why I mentioned them together. I'm still pretty sure my solution will work in linear time and stick by it until someone else comes up with something better. –  Michael Dorgan Feb 20 '13 at 16:43

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