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I have an insert stored procedure and I would like to dynamically set the SELECT clause table depending on a parameter value the user sends in. I'll post an example of what I think it should look like:

* Edit, I originally posted incorrect code example. My apologies *

CREATE PROC [spInsertLOG_ReqClone]
  (@NewReqID char(8),
   @ReqID char(8),
   @SiteCode char(3),
   @RequestorID char(6),
   @CloneFromPo bit) 

AS BEGIN
DECLARE @ReqCreatedDate datetime = GetDate() 
SET @NewReqID = dbo.fnLOG_ReqIDGenerator(@SiteCode) --Generates New ReqID

INSERT INTO LOG_ReqHeader (

        ReqID,
        ReqCreatedDate,
        RequestDate,
        RequiredByDate

        )
(SELECT
 @NewReqID,
 @ReqCreatedDate,
 @ReqCreatedDate,
 @RequiredByDate


FROM LOG_ReqHeader h
WHERE h.ReqID = @ReqID )


INSERT INTO LOG_ReqLineItems
 (ReqID,
  QtyOrdered,
  UI,
  PartNumber,
  Nomenclature )

If @CloneFromPO = 0  -- Use line items intially entered in ReqLineITems table
BEGIN
(SELECT 
 @NewReqID,
 l.QtyOrdered,
 l.UI,
 l.PartNumber,
 l.Nomenclature

FROM ReqLineItems l 
WHERE l.ReqID = @ReqID)

END

If @CloneFromPO = 1  -- Use line items after PO was issued from PO table

Begin
(SELECT 
 @NewReqID,
 l.Qty_Ord,
 l.UnitOfIssue,
 l.Part_Number,
 l.Item_Desc

FROM PO_LineItems l 
WHERE l.ReqID = @ReqID)

END
END
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3 Answers

Here is one way, though I suspect dynamic SQL might be better in terms of plan quality and stability:

INSERT dbo.LOG_ReqHeader 
( 
    ReqID,
    ReqCreatedDate,
    RequestDate,
    other columns
)
SELECT
  @NewReqID,
  @ReqCreatedDate,
  CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  other columns
FROM
(
  SELECT col1, col2, col3
    FROM dbo.table1
    WHERE @CloneFromPo = 0
    AND ReqID = @ReqID
  UNION ALL
  SELECT col1, col2, col3
    FROM dbo.table2
    WHERE @CloneFromPo = 1
    AND ReqID = @ReqID
) AS x;
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I probably didn't do a good enough job explaining the two tables I'm cloning from. Table_1 would contain requisition line items the user entered into the system originally, and Table_2 would be the eventual Purchase Orders that actually got purchased. The user would indicate which of the two they needed to clone so the union would not work in this situation. Thanks for the input. –  Alan Fisher Feb 20 '13 at 18:43
    
Why, are the two tables of a different schema? If so, don't the output results have to match in order to perform the insert? Maybe edit the question so it shows what you're trying to do instead of a bunch of pseudo-meaninglessness –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 20 '13 at 18:47
    
I just realized that I didn't add the correct code in my original post, very sorry for the oversight. I will edit the original post and try to be clearer on what I want. –  Alan Fisher Feb 21 '13 at 0:27
    
As you can see from my edit, the reason I thought the Union wouldn't work was because the two tables I am using have different field names, which is out of my control. After editing my code example I think that I could use a View as my data source along with your example and alias the fields to be the same name regardless of the table the data came from. That would then produce a cleaner solution. I'll try it and post back with my results. Thanks again. –  Alan Fisher Feb 21 '13 at 0:52
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It's not a very pretty solution because of the duplication, but this could be what you want:

    CREATE PROC [spInsertLOG_ReqClone]

(@NewReqID char(8),
@ReqID char(8),
@SiteCode char(3),
@RequestorID char(6),
@CloneFromPo bit) 

IF @CloneFromPo = 0 

BEGIN
    INSERT INTO LOG_ReqHeader ( 
            ReqID,
            ReqCreatedDate,
            RequestDate, SOME_OTHER_FIELDS)
    (SELECT
     @NewReqID,
     @ReqCreatedDate,
     @ReqCreatedDate, SOME_OTHER_FIELDS
        FROM Table_1
        WHERE reqID = @ReqID)

END

IF @CloneFromPo = 1

BEGIN
    INSERT INTO LOG_ReqHeader ( 
            ReqID,
            ReqCreatedDate,
            RequestDate, SOME_OTHER_FIELDS)
    (SELECT
     @NewReqID,
     @ReqCreatedDate,
     @ReqCreatedDate, SOME_OTHER_FIELDS
        FROM Table_1
        WHERE reqID = @ReqID)

END
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You will need to One way would be to use dynamic SQL to do this. Before you rush off and using dynamic sql I would recommend reading this article: http://www.sommarskog.se/dynamic_sql.html

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Dynamic SQL might be one way to do it, but it's not the only way. :-) –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 20 '13 at 1:05
    
There is almost always more than one way to skin a cat :-) –  Abe Miessler Feb 20 '13 at 6:15
    
Yes, but "you will need to" implies there is only one. –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 20 '13 at 9:28
    
Yeah I know. I was agreeing with your first statement. –  Abe Miessler Feb 20 '13 at 16:04
    
I am familiar with Sommarskog's article, I have created a few stored procedures using his dynamic sql example but I have since used other methods because of the frustration of not having intellisense. I was going to create two seperate sproc's and handle the use in the front end but Andorbol's solution seems to be the cleanest I have found. Thanks for the input. –  Alan Fisher Feb 20 '13 at 18:39
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